Thursday, January 23, 2020

How to Nail The 5 Frequently Asked Interview Questions

By

Are you preparing for a job interview? If so, ask yourself the following: How certain are you that your responses will make the grade? How can you build rapport, speak to your abilities with confidence and leave a favorable impression? How might you best position yourself as a knowledgeable insider—someone who can be counted on to hit the ground running?

In order to present yourself well at a job interview, it goes without saying that you need to prepare in detail. You have to thoroughly research the company, the needs of the hiring manager and the principle goals of the organization. Once you’ve done that, you will want target your responses to the specific skills and attributes they are seeking in a future employee.

But there are some shortcuts. You can count on several basic questions coming up—in one form or another—in almost every job interview. And fumbling your answers to these frequently asked questions can really trip you up. If you don’t take adequate time to prepare and target your responses, you will swiftly be eliminated from the candidate pool.

The following are 5 basic questions you absolutely need to nail:

4) Give me a time when you… (the event-specific, behavioral-style  question)
  • Study the job description and pinpoint the specific skills requested in the ad
  • Anticipate questions and prepare targeted examples
  • Create a “cheat sheet” (using a resume copy for yourself) complete with trigger words that will help you remember the examples you want to use
5) Do you have any questions for us?
Yes, you do! It is critical that you come with a list of well thought out questions. Then you can pick and choose the most appropriate as the interview unfolds.
  • It’s best to start with open-ended questions that will get the hiring manager talking about his/her true needs.
  • What do you see to be the most critical components of the job?
  • What needs to be done immediately?
  • What are some of the long-range goals of the position?
  • How can the new person make your life easier?
Also be certain to ask questions that show you’ve done your homework.
  • I understand your company is expanding into new markets in Asia. How will this affect your department?
  • With the launch of product X, how do anticipate customer reaction?
If you prepare compelling and targeted responses to these 5 typically asked questions, you can approach the interview from a position of strength. Take pride in the skills and experience you offer a future employer and get yourself psyched to win. With the right attitude, confidence in your abilities and a little luck, you just might find yourself at the top of the candidate list!

Read all 5 Questions and their Answers + the complete article

Wednesday, January 15, 2020

5 LinkedIn Growth-Hacking Strategies for 2020




LinkedIn may not get as much love in the social media world as platforms like Instagram and Facebook, but there’s still no better way to get in front of business decision-makers than LinkedIn. If you’re a marketer, salesperson or another type of professional who wants to connect with executives and other brand leaders who have the ability to actually write you a check, LinkedIn is where you want to be.

As someone who previously worked as a global senior social marketing manager at LinkedIn and who still works with the platform as an instructor for LinkedIn Learning, I can say first-hand that there are concrete steps you can take to find success on this network, including:

1. Use the right set of keywords.

LinkedIn can be used as a search engine of sorts, where recruiters, brand marketers, CEOs, etc., can find people to work with by simply typing in a few keywords related to what they’re looking for, like “software engineers,” “graphic designers” or any other term that can lead them to qualified individuals. That means that you need to optimize your LinkedIn profile, especially in your “About” section, to include keywords related to what you want to be contacted for so that others can find you.

4. Leverage LinkedIn, Twitter and Instagram together.

Since you don’t want to go for the hard sell through LinkedIn after connecting there, or worse, send a cold pitch to someone you found on LinkedIn but never met, you can instead leverage multiple social media networks together. For example, it’s fine for sales professionals to compile a database of prospects based on who they find or connect with on LinkedIn, but then take the time to connect on other platforms like Twitter and Instagram to get to know them better.

For example, on Twitter a prospect may share a more personal opinion than they would on LinkedIn, which can give you a chance to respond organically and form a more human connection. Or if you connect with someone through Instagram first, connect with them on LinkedIn too so when the moment is right to talk business, you have the opportunity to do so in an environment where that prospect is comfortable.


See all 5 strategies, a video from Carlos, and the full Entrepreneur article

Tuesday, January 14, 2020

Job Hunting Advice for People Over 50

By Karen Wickre

My new book, Take the Work Out of Networking: An Introvert’s Guide to Making Connections That Count,  is for job seekers of all ages, but I’d like to offer some advice here about networking and job hunting specifically to people who are 50+.

It’s easy to understand the reluctance people this age sometimes have about networking — meeting strangers, especially those who might be younger and may represent the change they fear. Not unreasonably, the older worker might think: Why would they help me? What will we have to talk about? What if they say no?

I’ve seen quite a few work veterans set their sights lower or stay in a stale longtime role, playing the waiting game for a severance package, because of such fears.

Job Hunting Advice About Age Discrimination

To combat age discrimination of employers, when you’re job hunting look closely at the diversity and inclusion record of companies you’re interested in, search LinkedIn to see if people in your age range work there and make connections to get a reality check.

An efficient way to learn about a new industry or pick up a variety of skills quickly is to join a specialist consulting agency (for example, marketing and advertising, tech support, communications) that has clients across a range of businesses.

Or you might consider roles in firms that are not brand names, less well-known companies outside the spotlight where you can get the skills you need to transition into a new area.

The Networking Advantage People 50+ Have

Two more points about job hunting and networking when you’re in the 50+ club:

First, the longer you’ve worked (and lived), the more contacts you’ll have from a wide variety of backgrounds. Your weak ties (people you know very slightly at best, perhaps worked with briefly or met through a friend) are especially useful as you explore new options and locations.  Think very broadly about who you know, including people you may have met in passing or who are colleagues of friends, to learn about opportunities that are not familiar.

Second, think about how you can position yourself as a “men- tern” — a neologism that describes someone who can mentor others while learning new skills as an intern does (not that you have to actually be in that role).

In his new book Wisdom @ Work: The Making of a Modern Elder, the seasoned hotelier and entrepreneur Chip Conley tells the story of joining Airbnb at age 52. Though Chip has earned plenty of EQ (emotional intelligence) over his career, he says he came to the young company with no discernible DQ (digital intelligence). As he tells it, his time at Airbnb helped him gain DQ as he was able to impart EQ to younger colleagues.

If Your Network Is Dormant -- Read the full article for more advice, tips, and tricks...




Thursday, January 9, 2020

The 5 Deadly Phrases To Avoid In The Job Interview Process

Chris Westfall

When it comes to the job interview process, whoever tells the best story wins. But certain phrases and ideas can short-circuit your career plans. Are you really able to have the kind of leadership conversation your job search deserves? When it comes to creating the career conversation that leads to consideration, avoid these five show-stoppers in the interview.

1 - When Is Honesty NOT the Best Policy? - do you ever find yourself saying a version of this phrase: “If I’m being honest...”? TBH, that phrase is honestly hurting your chances in the interview process. Here’s why: if I need to call out the fact that I’m being honest right now, doesn’t it make you wonder if I’ve been honest with you up until this point? Why did I wait until now to get real and spill the T? Actually, in the interview, honesty is the only policy that works. Highlighting the fact that you are getting to the truth, but only just right now, can arouse suspicion and make people wonder why you aren’t full-on honest all the time. If you are a person of integrity, honesty is your default setting. Don’t create unnecessary suspicion. “To be honest...” is a filler phrase — like “umm” “Uh...” and “like.” None of those fillers are very satisfying in the job interview. So be really honest with yourself, and leave out the words that don’t serve you.

5 - Ultimatums - an ultimatum is a statement of what you won’t tolerate, usually phrased as a demand. Ultimatums reflect terms that you will or won’t accept, period. By definition, ultimatums point to your lack of flexibility and adaptability (two characteristics that might be useful for a new hire, wouldn’t you agree? Why would you demonstrate that you lack these two key qualities?) Now some ultimatums are important: “I won’t tolerate racism on my team,” for example, points to your beliefs and values. But “I won’t work on weekends” or “I need every Thursday afternoon off, or I can’t work here” is really pointing out your limitations. Look for phrases like “I can’t accept _______,” “I won’t allow that” or “That just won’t work for me.” Because if it won’t work for you, maybe you won’t work for this company. Every job interview is a negotiation. Once you get to “yes” you can decide if you want to take the job or not. You’re in the interview to explore your options — why start cutting yourself off from possibilities? Does it help your career to present demands and requirements, or are there other ways of looking at the situation? Is your ultimatum a personal preference that you’re clinging to, like a security blanket, or a statement of your integrity, values and work ethic? It’s better to keep your options open if you really want the job. Know the difference between uncompromising values and limiting statements that knock you out of the running. Keep your options open. Find out what’s really on offer and make a business decision to see if it fits for you. Ultimately, what you will and won’t accept is your choice, but arriving at that place without ultimatums is a smart way to frame the conversation.  

See all 5 deadly phrases and the complete Forbes article

Tuesday, January 7, 2020

How to create the LinkedIn headline that will get you noticed in 2020