Tuesday, October 6, 2020

6 Ways To Stand Out On Social Media When Searching For A New Job

Jack Kelly

The traditional job search methods of attending face-to-face networking events, inviting people to get a cup of coffee, dinner, an after-work cocktail and schmoozing at the office have been rendered irrelevant due to the pandemic.  

If you’re actively searching for a new job, you need to engage in an authentic branding and marketing campaign on social media. The key is to showcase your skills, ability, knowledge, achievements and brilliance. You also need to broadcast what you are looking to do next, so people are aware of how they can help you. It shouldn’t just be a one-way street. Offer your services to help others in need too.

3. What To Do Online

The best way to start branding yourself is by commenting, sharing, writing posts and articles on LinkedIn. The content should focus on your area of expertise, as you have a lot of knowledge to impart.

You can start slowly by liking and addressing the postings of others. Find leaders in your field with large followings. Get involved in their conversations to amplify your own voice. Keep in mind that the questions you answer and your responses should burnish your brand. Avoid getting sucked into toxic online arguments and stay far away from politics for now.

If you want to take it to the next level, create videos. You can discuss matters relevant to your field. In addition to LinkedIn, also pay attention to other social media platforms that are relevant to your profession. 

Set a schedule to contribute on a consistent basis. If you only post once in a while, you’ll get lost. Post regularly, so people get to know you and become interested in what you have to say next. You’ll start building an audience by continually marketing yourself. People will feel like they know you and would gladly help you out with job leads. 


5. Brag A Bit

Share some recent wins, accomplishments and achievements. Write about exciting projects that you’re working on. If you are an expert in your field, seek out online conferences and networking events. Try to become a speaker. This spotlight will make you known to a wider audience and you’ll be viewed as an expert and a leader in your space.  

6. Authenticity Counts

Be open about your goal of finding a new job. Let people know that you’re in the job market and what specifically you want to do next. If no one knows that you’re on the job hunt, they won't reach out to you with opportunities.  

It's fine to write about the emotions, challenges and pressure you're dealing with in your job search. By openly expressing yourself, people will get to know you as a real person.


See all 6 ways and the complete Forbes article

 

Never put these 3 ‘outdated’ sections at the top of your resume, says career expert

 

 J.T. O’Donnell

Landing your dream job is all about making a good first impression, and much of that has to do with what you put at the very top of your resume. Unfortunately, too many job seekers don’t utilize this space to their best advantage.

One of the biggest mistakes job seekers make is starting their resumes with long-winded, boring and self-important paragraphs about how great they are. But guess what? Everyone applying for that position thinks they’re great and worthy of a recruiter’s time.

Here are three outdated resume techniques that no longer work with hiring managers:

  1. Summary statements: The responsibilities and accomplishments listed in the job history section of your resume should already paint a picture of what you bring to the table, so there’s no need to amplify it with a long preface.
  2. Objective statements: This doesn’t offer any new or useful information. What’s the point of spelling out the obvious fact that you’re interested in the position?
See all 3 things PLUS what to do instead

Monday, October 5, 2020

10 Ways to Ask for the Job at the Interview

By Robin Madell

Wondering how to ask for a job? If you really want a particular job, then simply asking for it at the end of your interview may help seal the deal. Hiring managers like hearing an interviewee say they want the job – it shows an enthusiasm for the role and confirms that you’re invested in earning it. It would be a rare manager who wouldn’t be flattered by someone expressing that they sincerely want to be awarded the position that the company is offering.

While it may feel uncomfortable to come out and directly ask for what you want, it’s important to remember that you’re bringing something valuable to the table: your skills and experience. If you keep this in mind, it can help level the playing field and boost your confidence as you prepare to ask for a job in person.

While you shouldn’t fear hearing “no” or feel that it’s presumptuous or too forward to indicate you would genuinely like the job, you should be sure that you indeed truly want the position. If you have any hesitation or uncertainty or think you may be applying for the wrong reasons, then don’t lead the employer astray by suggesting otherwise.

Assuming you really want the opportunity, keep in mind that the way that you go about phrasing your ask can make or break whether or not your request is effective. Consider this list of potential phrases to say when asking for a job at the end of an interview – without sounding like you’re begging.

10 Ways to Ask for a Job at the Interview

  • “After hearing you discuss the position, I remain confident that I’d be a great fit for it. I’d love to join your team to help you reach your goals.”
  • “The position sounds amazing, and I’m very excited about what the company is doing. I’d love to be seriously considered for this position.”
  • “After talking with you, I feel like we’d work really well together. Is there anything else I can tell you about my background to help convince you to hire me?”
  • “I’m very excited about what you’ve explained you’re looking for in this position, because I feel I’m a perfect fit for it. Do you have a sense yet of when you’ll be making a final decision? I’d love to work with you and your team.”
See all 10 ways and the complete US News article

 

Wednesday, September 30, 2020

The Four Biggest Mistakes You're Making On LinkedIn

Lacey Abbacchi

LinkedIn should be an essential part of every business, especially as the world's largest professional networking platform with more than 690 million members. However, it can be tricky to navigate if you're not familiar with it, which means a lot of mistakes are made. Here are four mistakes that you're making on LinkedIn and how you can fix each one.

1. Treating Your Profile Like A Resume

Unless you're a job seeker, you don't want your profile to look like a resume. Of course, people need to know what you do and how you do it, but it's also important to show them the things that make you who you are.

On a platform of millions, why would someone stop and explore your profile? Take some time to think about this question.

People are much more likely to hear what you have to say if they feel like they know you. So when creating your profile, make sure to answer these questions:

• Why should others do business with you?

• How can you help?

• What makes you relatable?

• Who are you as a person?

Adding personal components to your profile position you to build more meaningful relationships and make it easier for people to approach you.

2. Sales Pitching Immediately Upon Connecting

It's happened to all of us at least once on LinkedIn. You receive a connection request, decide to accept and then bam! Five seconds later, here comes the dreaded sales pitch.

Would you go up to a random person without shaking their hand and say, "Hello, I'm Lacey, and this is what I do. Are you interested in buying my services?" Of course not. This also applies to LinkedIn. You must build rapport, trust and relationships. 

We are all on LinkedIn to promote ourselves and our businesses and the platform is full of so much opportunity. But, you must remember that before people buy from you, they want to know who you are and if they can trust you.

So instead, focus on building the "know, like, trust" factor and then thoughtfully plug in what you do, when appropriate. (Here's a hint: It's not 5 minutes after first connecting.)

See all 4 mistakes and the complete Forbes article

 

Tuesday, September 29, 2020

LinkedIn unveils new look and messaging features, plans to release Stories globally

LinkedIn Stories, like on other social networks, lets you post photos and videos that vanish in 24 hours.

LinkedIn said Thursday that it's rolling out a new design for the business-oriented social network, introducing more messaging features and planning to offer Stories, which lets users post photos and videos that vanish in a day, globally.

LinkedIn has been testing Stories in certain countries such as Brazil, Australia, France and the Netherlands. Now the company said it's launching Stories in the US and Canada but will also roll out the tool globally during the following week.The upcoming global rollout of Stories shows that LinkedIn, like other social networks, is fueling the creation of more video and ephemeral content on its platform.

LinkedIn is also pushing further into messaging as more members use the tool on the social network. Users will be able to select multiple messages at a time to archive or delete. They'll also be able to delete or edit a sent message and react to a message with an emoji. And messaging on LinkedIn will include icons for videoconferencing services BlueJeans, Zoom and Microsoft, so users can video chat with the tap of button. 

Read the full cnet article 

11 Interview Tips You Wish You Knew Before Your Last Job Interview

 

So, what can you do to stand out in the crowd? Understanding the difference between an average interview and a great interview can help you narrow the gap.

When delving back into the job market, preparation is key to getting a step up. What will you offer that other candidates can’t? How will you answer certain questions? What soft skills do you bring with you? Let’s take a look at 11 tips that can help you not only have a great interview but give you a good chance at landing the job.

Interview Tips to Help You Land the Job: 11 Tips to Get an Edge Up on the Competition

1.       Ask relevant questions. When you’re in the process of being interviewed, there usually comes a point where they’ll ask if you have any questions about the position you’re applying for. Saying no isn’t a great way to close the interview. Instead, ask the right questions which show you take the process seriously and want the job. This back-and-forth engagement is not only important, but also allows you a chance to show your value to their company in the answers you give. Of course, always come prepared having researched the company, position, and what the competition may be like.

Here’s a list of nine questions to ask during your interview. You don’t have to ask a lot of questions but having a couple in mind is a smart move.

  • What type of work culture and values does the company hold?
  • Is there opportunity for growth?
  • What will my day to day responsibilities be?
  • What challenges do you feel come with this position?
  • Do you think I’m right for this role?
  • How does this position fit into the company’s overall plan?
  • What do you like best about working for this company?
  • What benefits come with working here?
  • How does the company measure success with their employees?

2.      Know your value and demonstrate that value. It’s not enough to simply go into the interview with confidence. Remember, there’s a lot of competition. This is about communicating your value and letting the hiring manager know that you’re the right candidate for the position they’re trying to fill.  If you’re a great fit, you’re going to benefit their team in reaching their business goals. It’s important to stand out amongst a sea of candidates. You do that by communicating your value, plain and simple.  Leave no question in their mind that you’re the right person for the job.

4.      Demonstrate problem solving skills. Problem solving skills is an important asset you can bring to the company you’re applying to. Being able to show that you have this soft skill adds value and shows you are able to work through issues as they arise. How do you do this? You can use one of two methods to easily show this skill. Let’s look at two acronyms that can help you recognize the best way to demonstrate you’re a strong problem solver.

  • STAR: Specific, Task, Action, Result. In this instance, you’ll discuss a specific situation (not generalized), what task needed to be accomplished, what action you took, and the final result which shows the outcome and success of how you handled things at the time.
  • PAR: Problem, Action, Results. This is another easy to remember acronym which shows you how to position your answers. You speak about a problem that occurred, the action in which you took, and the final results from taking that action.
  • Note: they both do a similar thing. You’re pinpointing a circumstance, you demonstrate you were able to handle the situation as it came about, and that with your problem- solving skills, you delivered a solution that had a positive outcome. This positions you as the hero of the story, but also shows them you are capable of tackling problems with a solid thought process.

5.      Show them you want the job by asking for it. This is not a plea of desperation. Rather, it’s showing you’re genuinely interested in the position and working for their company. Tell them that you’d love the opportunity to work with them, and don’t leave a question in their mind that you actually want the position if it’s offered to you.

Nothing says lack of interest more than a lukewarm response. In essence, it’s the same as asking somebody how you look, and they say “fine,” when what you really wanted to know was that you look okay for whatever situation you’re about to attend. Think about a bride on her wedding day, walking down the aisle, and asking her partner how she looks. Fine. Show genuine interest—don’t fake it.

See all 11 Tips and the complete article

 

Monday, September 21, 2020

13 Clever Ways Professionals Can Leverage Social Media For Career Networking

The way you present yourself influences how you are seen and, ultimately, your success in business. Social media has made it easy to craft a profile customized to appeal to just about any online audience. For business leaders and professionals, the temptation to present an image of who you would like to be instead of who you are can be overwhelming. However, creating a false impression can backfire when meeting potential clients or business partners face-to-face, as they may feel betrayed to find that you are nothing like your online persona.

As a working professional, it’s in your best interest to ensure that the image you project of yourself online is an authentic and accurate representation of who you are in real life. We asked 13 members of Forbes Coaches Council to offer their best tips to help you confidently project your genuine self on social media platforms in the most professional way possible.

4. Don't Overthink It
Whether or not you realize it, you already have a brand that attracts people who are naturally drawn to you and to your perspectives. Continue to do what you do, in the way that only you can do it, and more raving fans will be coming your way. Trying to be someone you are not will feel like being in quicksand, and you will soon be sniffed out as a fraud. Yikes! - Karan RhodesShockingly Different Leadership

6. Clarify What You Do And Why
Projecting authenticity without purpose falls flat and comes across as boastful promotion. Be clear about what you do and why you do it. Your purpose doesn't have to appear great to anyone else. If you want to entertain, be a truthful and authentic entertainer. If your purpose is to teach, live your truth and teach your truth. Be consistent, and keep refining your authentic purpose every day. - Paul GeigerPublic Speaking Advantage

7. Determine Your Most Essential Qualities
You first need to get clear on the qualities that you most want to project. Make a list of 10 positive, professional adjectives that authentically describe you. Ask a few trusted work colleagues to pick their top five that they see in you. Then, whittle those down to your three most essential. Choose articles, infographics and other resources to share with your audience that embody your three words. - Loren MargolisTraining & Leadership Success LLC

See all 13 ways and the complete Forbes article 

Wednesday, September 16, 2020

5 Simple Ways To Maximize Your Job Search

Caroline Castrillon

A job search can be stressful and overwhelming, especially in the middle of a pandemic. You may even question whether it makes sense to continue to apply for positions. Yet, the rapidly changing work environment may also bring about new opportunities. Whether you’re looking for a new job or considering a full-blown career change, these tips will help you maximize your efforts during these trying times.

2) Clarify your goals

The first order of business is to set goals for your job search. Without having a destination in mind, you will lack focus and won’t know where to invest your time. A big mistake job seekers make is applying to every position under the sun. Focus on quality over quantity. Rather than just dedicating a specific number of hours to your job search, develop measurable milestones. Consider establishing concrete commitments on a daily or weekly basis for tasks such as:
  • Sending out X number of resumes
  • Researching X companies of interest
  • Reconnecting with X former colleagues
Take small steps and be consistent in your efforts.

4) Practice video interviewing

Given the current climate, you will likely be interviewing via Zoom, Skype or some other video conferencing software. Don’t underestimate how unpredictable technology can be. Look for a location where you can control your lighting and surroundings. Test your internet speed to be sure it’s fast enough and use a wired ethernet connection instead of Wi-Fi. Consider using an external microphone and webcam for better quality and do a complete run-through at least the day before your interview. The number one thing recruiters say they hate to see in a video interview is distractions, so take steps to remove interruptions. Remember to look into the camera, smile and have a positive attitude. Ultimately, preparing for a video interview is the same as preparing for a face to face meeting. The more you practice, the more comfortable you will feel.

See all 5 ways and the complete Forbes article

Tuesday, September 15, 2020

LinkedIn offers top 20 professional courses for free through the end of September

 

 By Kayla Webster

 

It’s back-to-school time for employees too — LinkedIn Learning is offering their 20 most popular online courses of the year for free throughout the month of September.

LinkedIn executives say they’re offering the courses free of charge to help as many employees as possible cope with the pandemic — especially workers from underrepresented communities and those affected by layoffs. LinkedIn Learning saw a 130% uptick in course participation once shelter-in-place orders were issued in March.

“With a lot of people out of work or working remotely at this time, we are seeing a lot of employees investing in themselves and their careers,” says Mordy Golding, director of content strategy for English-language at LinkedIn Learning. “Our hard skill classes, like Excel, are still popular, but there are soft skills we all need in order to succeed in the new normal.”

LinkedIn’s most popular course teaches people strategies for helping them work from home more efficiently. The shift to remote work has been a challenge for employees, who have struggled with increased stress and burnout, says Dave Crenshaw, a productive leadership author and LinkedIn Learning instructor.

“We have a lot of freedom when we’re working from home,” says Crenshaw, who has worked remotely for the past 20 years. “[Employers’] biggest concern is that the people working from home are going to slack off. But the bigger problem is that people never stop working, and that hurts productivity in the long run — performance degrades and work-life balance erodes.”

While employees and managers may be tempted to stick to hard skill courses, Golding recommends participating in classes that focus on soft skills like “being a good listener” because it “transfers well to the remote workforce,” he says. He also suggests that employers take advantage of LinkedIn Learning’s group feature to allow teams to take the courses collectively.

“A very large percentage of people who watch the courses can immediately apply the skills they’ll learn to their job,” Golding says. “If you’re thinking about the long-term health of your organization, it’s a good idea to leverage learning to have an immediate impact on productivity, and bring people together.”

1) Time Management: Working from Home
Instructor: Dave Crenshaw

Help your employees learn how to set up a dedicated workspace for maximum productivity, collaborate with their colleagues, craft their daily schedule and master the art of virtual meetings. This course also offers advice for working parents, and other caregivers, about how to more effectively balance professional and personal responsibilities at home.
5) Developing Your Emotional Intelligence
Instructor: Gemma Leigh Roberts

Roberts explains what emotional intelligence is and why it's important in today’s workforce. She can help learners become more self-aware so they can acclimate to the dynamic new world of work. 
 
10) Project Management Foundations
 
Instructor: Bonnie Biafore

In this course, Biafore explains the fundamentals of project management — from establishing project goals and objectives to managing resources, meeting deadlines and bringing projects to completion. 
12) Learning Personal Branding
Instructor: Chelsea Krost

Honing your employees’ personal branding helps their ideas get noticed to sell to internal stakeholders, partners and customers. Krost explains how to develop a personal story and build a personal brand presence online and off.
See all 20 courses and the complete BenefitNews article

Monday, September 14, 2020

5 Tips To Build Your Personal Brand On LinkedIn

 

Since LinkedIn was founded in 2002, it has grown to a community of 660 million-plus members. LinkedIn has opened new arenas of usability for professionals on the platform. Benefits of using LinkedIn extend beyond networking, increasing job opportunities, finding business leads as the platform creates several intangible benefits like creating a personal brand name and increasing credibility.

“Everyone is trying to build their personal brand on LinkedIn. It’s not just top level management and well established leaders, but also students, freelancers, start-up founders and hustlers. Everyone recognizes the benefits of a large following and high engagement on the platform and users want to leverage the platform to take advantage of the benefits of personal branding,” according to Tannisha Avarrsekar, founder of Lokavyuha Strategy and Communications.



Though the platform can be leveraged to create several benefits for its users, gaining visibility and personal marketing on the platform has become increasingly challenging. The most common tips given by personal branding experts include posting a professional personal profile picture on the platform, updating skills, education and work, and posting regularly and commenting.

Since most of the users are now aware of these basic tips, there is no real profile differentiation or branding created by incorporating these strategies on the platform. Posting regularly is not the ‘key mantra’ for personal branding on LinkedIn anymore, because posting regularly may not increase your visibility or network. LinkedIn marketing in 2020, in the era of COVID uncertainty calls for a different approach for building a personal brand on LinkedIn.

2) Share Posts of Other Influencers Which Are Relevant

Though most LinkedIn influencers recommend posting content on the platform regularly to increase engagement, often they take for granted that not everyone has the time to create original posts on the platform. Creating an original post or article may be time consuming and challenging to do on a daily basis. However, it may be easy for you to repost relevant content on the platform to keep your audience engaged.

“Sharing content of other influencers is a great way to leverage the platform to your advantage. You don’t need to have original content to post, reposting content which is different and giving the creator credit for it helps to boost your own profile. Your main aim should be posting great content, even if it means reposting articles, research papers or posts if you don’t have time to create content yourself,” says Avarrsekar. Reposting content of influencer’s also increases the quality of content on your feed itself, ensures high reach and engagement.


Moreover, sharing content of LinkedIn influencers increases your reach within the influencer’s network itself. Hence, the ‘share’ tool on LinkedIn is a quick way to increase engagement and build your network and it is definitely easier than posting original content.

3) Leverage The Power of Storytelling to Enhance Your Personal Brand

Sharing your personal story on the platform creates a more human touch and makes your personal brand relatable to other users on the platform. Moreover, this strategy is easy to use because writing about your own experiences from memory takes less time than doing research to create a post.

Harsh Karamchandani, co-founder of ed-tech start-up Edunify, explains “You don’t need to be a popular personality to establish your personal brand on the platform. The platform empowers everyone because it gives everyone a voice. You can use the power of storytelling on the platform to highlight your personal life experiences which other people can learn from. Being the co-founder of a start-up, I use the power of storytelling to narrate my journey, experience and challenges, and my stories resonate with other aspiring start-up entrepreneurs which increases my engagement.” Storytelling also creates a personal brand which is more genuine and real because users can see the real person behind the LinkedIn profile.


Most often people hesitate before posting their failure stories on LinkedIn. Posting about failures on LinkedIn can increase engagement and depict a strong personality based on constant learning. According to an article written by Vani Kola, managing director of Kalaari on LinkedIn “Is failure the new success?”, failure creates constant learning in one’s life and reflecting on failure is the path to improvement. Owning up to your failure’s on LinkedIn shows that you are willing to own up to your mistakes, learn from them and grow.

Posting about failures is an important part of personal brand building because it resonates with the audience via storytelling. Personal stories are likely to get more engagement and reach on the platform because they directly connect with the audience and display the real person behind the LinkedIn profile.

The power of storytelling can also be extended to highlighting the stories of people associated with your brand. Prerna Mukharya, founder of Outline India, a data firm focused on ground level impact, explains how Linkedin can be a powerful tool to meet the right people. “One of our initial projects at Outline India was through linkedin and I have not forgotten that. It is essential to stay authentic as one tries to make a point. Personal stories (stories from the field in our case about data collection), have been instrumental in reaching out to our target audience. I receive about 7-10 messages each week from people across the spectrum, sharing appreciation, kind words or looking to contribute to our greater goal of - creating social impact through data. In most cases, I do not know these people, but they are willing to offer their expertise, and their time to know about our story at Outline India.” Mukharya says. Hence highlighting stories of people who you are working with and interacting with is a part of your own storytelling and can be leveraged to create your personal brand.

5) Don’t Forget to Leverage the Power of a LinkedIn Article

While communication experts recommend making posts on LinkedIn regularly, very few focus on the power of writing articles on the platform. Around 45 per cent of the article readers on LinkedIn comprise upper level management. Hence, writing articles on the platform increases the possibility of you connecting with upper level management which increases your rating on the platform and boosts your following. Moreover, building relationships of increased engagement by top level management and getting their comments on your posts ensures more credibility towards your personal brand.

Though it may be challenging to increase the visibility of your posts, increasing visibility in an article can be much easier because only 0.2 per cent users on LinkedIn have published articles on the platform.

Here are a few general tips you can keep in mind when you are writing an article to create your personal brand on the platform. The tips are based on research conducted on LinkedIn publisher statistics:

-         Write long form articles, around 1,900 words to get the best engagement.
-         Post “how-to” and list format articles because they get higher number of shares
-         Split the article into 5, 7 or 9 sub headings
-         Ensure that the article title is 40-49 characters
-         Do not add videos to the article unless absolutely necessary
-         Try to add exactly 8 photos to the article
-          Post some original images with people’s faces in the article

See all 5 tips and the complete Entrepreneur article 

7 tips for troops transitioning to civilian world from a former Navy officer and career coach

 



His book, “Out of Uniform: Your Guide to Successful Military-to-Civilian Career Transition,” rereleased in April 2018, offers stories of triumph and misstep from veterans who have been there.

“I believe the book is as applicable to a civilian who has never worn the uniform as it is to my target audience — active duty, in uniform, getting ready to transition — what it does is illustrate points by telling these stories,” Wolfe said.


2) Know yourself and what’s important to you
Many transitioning veterans make the mistake of not taking the time develop self-knowledge, Wolfe said.

“The self-awareness that I understand my transition and before my job search, understand what exactly is important to me,” Wolfe said. “Until you know yourself and until you know your strengths, your attributes, your weaknesses, your wants and your needs, what matters to you at the end of the day, until you’ve identified that, you’re putting yourself at risk that you’re going to end up in a job for the wrong reasons.”

4) Learn how to translate your experience to the civilian world
The military has a very unique and specific way of operating that in many cases differs drastically from how civilian businesses and organizations do. Learning how to translate your experience into skills that civilian employers understand is key to landing a job.

“I think a great source would be the veteran service organizations. The dot orgs. The ones that are not in it for profit,” Wolfe said. “They’re in it for service. Most of them have tools that will help someone translate a military skillset. Some military skillsets have a direct civilian equivalency. Like a truck driver or a helicopter pilot. But then if you get an infantry officer, something like that, we don’t have a civilian equivalency anymore. Some of these people don’t think they’re qualified to do anything. They just don’t know how to describe what they do in terms of what civilian employers will understand.”

6) Get good at social media
Many employers do background checks, but more of them will search a candidate’s social media profiles. You can’t determine what a company will see in your background investigation, but you can control your social media presence. Learn how to use social media to your advantage, Wolfe said. Be sure to scrub your social media accounts for anything you wouldn’t want an employer to see. Put your best foot forward.

“If you go back 10 years ago and you had an insufficient or faulty resume, that was the kiss of death,” Wolfe said. “You weren’t going to get a screening interview, let alone a job. Well, now, social presence is that critical. If you do not have an appropriate, powerful, applicable social media presence across the board — if there’s anything missing or anything wrong — that’s the new kiss of death. You’ve got to be familiar with it. Social media is powerful for both the companies the organizations that are looking for people, but it’s also very powerful for individuals in preparing for interviews.”

See all 7 tips and the complete MilitaryTimes article

Sunday, September 13, 2020

9 Questions to Ask HR Before an Interview

 By

Job seekers spend a lot of time preparing for job interviews, especially when it comes to asking questions to the HR manager. And they should. The interview is the best chance to prove you are the right person for the job.

But, before the company interviews you, you should take some time to interview the company. Asking questions before the job interview is a great way for you to prepare for your big moment. The more information you have will give you an extra boost of confidence before and during the interview.

9 Questions to Ask Before an Interview

 

1. Who Will I Meet With?

An essential part of an interview is the preparation you do before the interview. This means doing your homework and learning about the people you’re going to meet with. 

Knowing who you’re meeting with can help you figure out what questions the interviewer(s) might ask you, and it can help you figure out which questions you want to ask which people.

For example, the HR director probably can’t describe what a typical day is like. Likewise, team members may not be able to tell you much about the benefits package. Knowing who you’re meeting with will help you prep the right questions for the right people.

It also gives you a bit of insight into the company’s culture. For example, if you meet with the team, that tells you that teamwork is a significant part of this company (or team’s) culture. And, if you meet with other teams that you might work with, that tells you that interdepartmental communication is important, too.

Lastly, knowing who you’re interviewing with gives you a chance to check them out. Research them on the company website, social media, and, of course, LinkedIn. You never know—you may find that you have something in common with one of these people, which could be a great icebreaker in the interview!

8. What Should I Be Prepared to Speak to in the Interview?

It’s unlikely that the scheduler will have an answer for this, so don’t be surprised if the answer is vague and non-committal. However, on the off chance that you do get an answer, listen closely to what the scheduler says.

The answer will likely give you insight into the company’s most pressing issues. What are the problems the company is trying to solve? More importantly, how will you solve those problems? The answer can help you understand what the employer most wants from potential candidates, and having this information can help you structure your answers accordingly.

9. What’s Your Dress Code? 

Whether it’s an on-site interview or video interview, find out what employees typically wear, then use that as a guide to choosing your interview outfit. Wear something that’s a notch up from the dress code, so you don’t overdress or underdress, but still look professional. You don’t want to show up in your best suit, only to discover that jeans and concert T-shirts are the standard company attire.

See all 9 questions and the complete FlexJobs article

Thursday, September 10, 2020

Your Ultimate Guide to Answering the Most Common Interview Questions

 Wouldn’t it be great if you knew exactly what questions a hiring manager would be asking you in your next job interview?

We can’t read minds, unfortunately, but we’ll give you the next best thing: a list of more than 40 of the most commonly asked interview questions, along with advice for answering them all. 

While we don’t recommend having a canned response for every interview question (in fact, please don’t), we do recommend spending some time getting comfortable with what you might be asked, what hiring managers are really looking for in your responses, and what it takes to show that you’re the right person for the job.

Consider this list your interview question and answer study guide.

  1. Tell Me About Yourself.
  2. How Did You Hear About This Position?
  3. Why Do You Want to Work at This Company?
  4. Why Do You Want This Job?
  5. Why Should We Hire You?
  6. What Are Your Greatest Strengths?
  7. What Do You Consider to Be Your Weaknesses?
  8. What Is Your Greatest Professional Achievement?
  9. Tell Me About a Challenge or Conflict You’ve Faced at Work, and How You Dealt With It.
  10. Tell Me About a Time You Demonstrated Leadership Skills.

See all 47 interview questions and how to answer them.

Tuesday, September 8, 2020

These 7 mistakes on your LinkedIn profile are killing your job search

 BY GWEN MORAN

The team at digital selling firm Vengreso was ready to hire an instructional designer. They found someone on LinkedIn who seemed perfect for the job, and he likely would have gotten an offer after a cursory interview. But there was just one problem, says co-founder and Chief Visibility Officer Viveka von Rosen: He had no contact information listed.
That was the “final straw” from an already weak profile, says von Rosen, author of LinkedIn Marketing: An Hour a Day. Sure, she could have messaged him through the platform, but they didn’t know how long it would take him to check for messages and the fact that his profile made it more difficult than necessary to contact him was a deal-breaker. The team moved on to look for someone else. “Update your contact information and consider including it in your summary, too,” she says. “Make it easy for them to find you.”
You may have built your LinkedIn profile and network over the course of years–or you may pay little attention to it at all. Either way, your profile may have red flags to recruiters or hiring managers, undermining your job search. But refreshing it doesn’t have to take long. In addition to keeping your contact information up-to-date, here are seven more red flags to keep in mind.

MISTAKE #1: A MISLEADING HEADLINE

The headline next to your photo is one of the most valuable pieces of LinkedIn real estate you have. Use it wisely, says  executive recruiter and career advancement coach Suzanne O’Brien. If you have aspirations of moving up, don’t use your current title in your headline. Instead, opt for something that reflects the job you want without being misleading. “Try using something that encompasses your current role and where you want to go, along with your unique value,” she suggests. For example, “Leadership in Product Management with Mobile and Healthcare Expertise” or “Marketing Professional for High-Growth Companies.”
“For the company that’s looking for someone with that expertise, they’ll know right away that you’re a ‘bull’s-eye’ candidate and they want to speak with you,” she says. Avoid very broad descriptions like “Consultant” or “Tech Explorer with a Systematic Approach.” Also, it’s not the best place for a quote from your favorite author, she says.

MISTAKE #4: RESUME MISMATCH

If you do nothing else before your next job hunt, do this: Pull up your resume and compare it side-by-side with your LinkedIn profile, Boggs says. Make sure the dates, positions, and job titles match. When resumes and LinkedIn profiles aren’t aligned, recruiters don’t know what to believe, she adds.

Monday, September 7, 2020

11 Emerging LinkedIn Trends And How To Prepare For Them

While LinkedIn dominates as the most popular social media site for both job seekers and companies to find networking opportunities and build professional connections, new trends constantly emerge, and the role of the platform is always evolving. To make the most of their LinkedIn presence, users on both sides of the recruiting equation need to stay aware of these trends and know how to leverage them.

For job seekers, tapping into these trends can get you noticed before the rest of the crowd—and in a saturated market, that could mean the difference between landing a job or losing out to other candidates. For recruiters, staying up on trends will help maximize the number of qualified candidates you have access to, which affords a breadth of options.

To find out how job seekers and recruiters can prepare to make the most of them, we asked 11 members of Forbes Coaches Council for their predictions around up-and-coming LinkedIn trends. Here's what they told us.

1. Moving Toward Online Training And Certification
LinkedIn is making its move toward distance education and online training, offering fresh courses such as digital marketing and social media management. Plus, it gives the opportunity to update your new achievement in your profile and connect with people with the same qualifications. Its variety is extensible, and soon enough, LinkedIn will compete with colossal certification organizations. - Jill Douka MBA, MCC, Global Academy Of Coaching

7. Becoming A Unique Source Of Candidates
My crystal ball says that, within five years, companies won't seek applications online; they will just source directly from LinkedIn. They will find the candidates based on algorithmic searching and AI and decide which ones they want to talk to. Candidates should prepare now in two ways: First, make sure your profile has relevant words, and then, learn networking for job search to reach the hiring team. - Dana Manciagli, Job Search Master Class

8. Expediting Social And Professional Proofing
Social and professional proofing will begin to carry greater weight as professionals want to know "who is endorsing this individual." With this, LinkedIn recommendations will begin to become more of a focal point. Recruiters and job seekers can prepare by tailoring their current functions to incorporate (review, consider, rank, track, etc.) recommendations. - Corey Castillo, Truth & Spears

See all 11 trends and the complete Forbes article

Friday, September 4, 2020

4 Big Changes To Your LinkedIn Profile You Need To Know About

 William Arruda


Your LinkedIn profile is one of the most powerful career assets you have. It’s your professional portfolio—a multimedia representation of who you are and the value you deliver. And in our new all-the-time, all-virtual world thanks to Covid-19, your LinkedIn profile has become your first impression. What’s more, your LinkedIn About section (formerly called your Summary) will be the most read version of your bio.  
In today’s uncertain times, it’s more important than ever to stay on top of your LinkedIn profile and to refine it regularly so it’s always relevant and compelling to the people you want to reach. You also need to stay on top of the myriad refinements and new features LinkedIn adds to the platform so you can instantly benefit from them and ensure your personal brand stands out and clearly differentiates you from the hundreds of millions of other LinkedIn members.
LinkedIn’s latest blog post references many of the most recent changes. The ones I highlight here will be most valuable to you as you build your brand and make a positive, authentic first impression online. 
1) Let people know you’re open to new adventures.
With the new OpenToWork photo frame on your headshot, you can alert those who are checking you out that you’re ready for your next big gig. I’m thrilled that LinkedIn added this. Before this feature came along, many who were seeking work used their headline to tell others of their availability with a statement like “Ready for my next adventure” or “Seeking New Opportunities.” This created two challenges. First, it sounded a little desperate, and second, it reduced the number of characters available in your headline to tell people who you are, what you do and the value you create when you do it. This new format is a little more subtle and creates consistency across the platform for those who are in job-seeking mode. The words in your headline are important in the LinkedIn search algorithm, so you want to use exactly the right keywords to reel in those who are looking for what you have to offer. Luckily, you no longer have to waste those words by telling people you’re looking for work.
3) Shine a spotlight on your best work.
LinkedIn has allowed you to add multimedia to your profile for years now, but they enhanced this feature recently. Before, you could add multimedia to the bottom of your About (and to the Experience section of your profile). Now, they’ve created a whole new section called Featured, where you can put your most relevant and up-to-date images, videos, PDFs, etc. to augment and reinforce what you say about yourself in your About. And it has been given some really important real estate, appearing in a large panel right below your About. Being a completely new element of your profile, the Featured section serves as a dynamic billboard of items you can showcase to demonstrate your brilliance. Update it regularly so it remains current and relevant.