Thursday, October 31, 2019

7 LinkedIn Mistakes That Will Make You Look Unprofessional

By: Todd Clarke

Your LinkedIn page and profile is your online billboard. It’s your chance to show and share your personal brand.

That is, if you do things right—not wrong.

Because too many people make too many mistakes when it comes to self-promoting on LinkedIn.

You want to show up as your very best on LinkedIn—the most ‘professional’ of all networks. So you can look like a pro. Get hired as a pro. Maybe even find business as a pro.

Here’s a list of seven common (and not-so-common) LinkedIn mistakes that make citizens of this social network look unprofessional.

Consider them to avoid getting fired before getting hired.

Yes, many of these are common sense. And yes, many people still commit these LinkedIn offences.

But not you. Not anymore.

No more hurting your credibility. No more being unclear about your expertise. No more making it hard for others to connect with you.

Let’s start from the top, literally.

4. Weak (or no) summary

Why it’s a problem

You’re wasting an opportunity to ‘continue your story’ that you started with your headline.
Just. Write. It.
It’s often the only part of your profile visitors will read (after your headline). Think of this section as your elevator pitch.

What to do about it

You’re more than just the summation of your job experience.
As such, don’t force your viewers to connect your work experience sections into a tidy story about you. That part is on you.
Some elements to consider for your concise story:
  • Who, what, why, when, and how
  • Core skills (commit to the few, versus the many)
  • Why you do what you do
  • What big problems you solve
  • Show any numbers
Write in the first person, because this is personal. Writing in 3rd person sounds pompous, and not personal. I mean it.

And of course, speak like a human, not a bot. Ditch the jargon, cliches, and baseless claims.

Remember the mantra… clear over clever. And 7 other tips for writing clearly.

“I’m passionate about transforming organizations into innovative, people-centric, businesses with a repeatable process that delights customers.”

Oh please.

“Specialized, leadership, passionate, strategic, experienced, focused, energetic, creative…”

Lose them all.

If you knew visitors would only read your summary, what do you want them to remember about you?

6. No personal message for your invite

Do I really need to list this mistake? Guess so, because I get invites like this too often. You probably do, too.

Why it’s a problem

You sound impersonal and provide no useful reason for connecting.
Why should someone blindly hit the ‘accept’ button when it feels like this…
Hi there.
You don’t know me. We never met. Never worked together. I live far, far away. And not sure we have anything in common.
However, why not add you (a complete stranger) to my trusted network?
You in?

What to do about it

Connect with a purpose. State that purpose in your request to connect.
A few reasons for connecting could be…
  • You read and appreciated their blog post
  • Maybe they could use your skills in the future
  • Maybe there’s a reason to partner and do business together
  • You know someone in common
You don’t need to write much, in fact, don’t. Be clear and succinct with your reason for connecting.

See all 7 mistakes, how to correct them, and the complete Hootsuite blog post.




Wednesday, October 30, 2019

Here's an example of the perfect resume, according to Harvard career experts

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Just the thought of writing a resume can lead to a huge headache.

But it doesn't have to be so complicated. Try to think of your resume as an award-winning short memoir about your professional experience.

Certainly, they aren't exactly the same (resumes shouldn't be written in a narrative style), but both share a few similarities: They tell the truth, differentiate you from others, highlight your most unique qualities and capture readers' attention.

Don't know where to start? The career experts suggest considering the essential tips below:

1. Tailor your resume

I've seen a shockingly large number of candidates send out a dozen resumes — that all look exactly the same — to a dozen different job openings.

A great resume should be tailored to the job and type of position that you're applying for. You don't have to change every little detail, but the resume itself should reflect the skills and experience that your potential employer would value.

2. Include your contact information

This is one of the top five resume mistakes people make, according to Harvard career experts.

Always be sure to include your email address and phone number. You can go the extra mile by adding your LinkedIn (just make sure it's up to date) or website that showcases examples of your work.

What not to include:
  • A list of references: You don't even need to put "references available upon request" — hiring managers will ask for this if you advance in the hiring process
  • A picture: It doesn't matter how strong your selfie game is — including your a photo of yourself makes you look unprofessional and could introduce unconscious bias
  • Age or sex: Again, keep it professional. It's a resume, not a Tinder profile...
See tips 3,4, and the complete CNBC article



 

Wednesday, October 23, 2019

How To Write A Winning Post-Interview Thank You Note (With Sample)

by

This is the one thing that most people forget to do (or do poorly)

If you’re in the midst of a job search or recently went through one, you’ll know first-hand how competitive the job market is.

No longer is it “good enough” to have a killer résumé.

You’ve got an equally impressive and custom-branded Linkedin profile and cover letter, and perhaps a one-page networking document.

You know how important it is to communicate what your value is, so you created and practiced your short elevator pitch that hooks the listener in a few seconds.

You’ve nailed some interviews as a result of being able to express your value verbally and in writing.

You know how to answer behavioural and situational questions because you created and practiced your long value proposition statement.

Congratulations!  You’re probably a lot farther ahead than most people.

But don’t get too comfortable – you’re not done yet!  There’s one other milestone that you need to meet that always seems to be an after-thought – if anyone thinks about it at all.

It’s following up to a successful interview with a killer thank you note.

This is no longer an option but a necessity and can make the difference between getting the job or being taken out of the running.

Why a thank you note is such a big deal

By today’s standards, a post-interview thank you note goes way beyond just being a social courtesy. It’s another opportunity to SELL YOURSELF for the job. Think of it like a follow up sales letter.

A well-crafted thank you note:  Read the full article to see what a thank you note can do for you, tips, and tricks.

Wednesday, October 16, 2019

LinkedIn Adds New Hub For Meeting In Person

By
 
LinkedIn took professional networking online. Now it wants to help people network in person again.

The Microsoft-owned social media network for professionals announced Tuesday that it's adding a new feature called Events that lets users organize in-person meetings. The new feature, which goes live in English speaking countries on Thursday, allows users to send out invites and provides attendees a place to discuss event details. 

Hosts can use filters search to search their networks for people they want to invite, including by location, company, industry, and school. Users can also make their events searchable so that others can join the events as well. 

Read the full Fortune article
 

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

How to answer 5 common trick questions designed to trip you up in an interview

Here’s what employers are hoping to glean from these simple questions—and how you can prepare to answer them with confidence.

Common interview questions such as “Tell me about yourself” may not make you panic as much as a bizarre question like “How do you make a peanut butter and jelly sandwich?” But they can still wreak havoc on your responses if you aren’t prepared.
Don’t be fooled by these deceptively simple questions. Experienced recruiters use questions like the ones below to trick you into divulging details you hadn’t planned on sharing during the interview. Here’s what employers are hoping to glean from these common yet tricky questions—and how you can prepare to answer them with confidence.

Tell me about yourself

Translation: Why are you a good fit?
This common interview question seems straightforward, yet it trips up many job seekers. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve watched a candidate go off the rails and share personal details that have nothing to do with the job. When employers ask this question, they’re not interested in hearing your autobiography. Instead, they want you to share a tailored version of your career story. Based on what you know about the job requirements and company, succinctly explain how your previous experiences have led you to this opportunity, as well as how they’ve qualified you for this particular role.

Tell me about a time when . . .
Translation: Prove it. Give me an example.
Many employers like to use this line of questioning—a technique called behavior-based interviewing—to assess a candidate’s potential. A recent TopResume study revealed this to be the single-most-important factor to employers when evaluating a potential hire. These open-ended questions encourage the candidate to share a story that illustrates how they’ve handled a previous situation that is likely to occur in this new role.

When faced with this interview question, stick to the STAR Method (Situation, Task, Actions, Results). Describe a situation or task you handled. Explain the actions you took to resolve the issue or overcome the challenge and summarize the results of your actions. While you might be unable to guess every behavior-based question a recruiter might throw at you, the job posting will offer some clues. Use the job requirements to brainstorm relevant behavioral questions and succinct stories from your work history you can share to demonstrate your abilities.

See all 5 questions and the complete Fast Company article