Thursday, November 21, 2013

LinkedIn’s 4 tips for getting people to notice you

By

Look, we all know that LinkedIn is incredibly important. That it’s gone beyond being an online CV is obvious. It’s also much more than just a place for making online business connections.

The professional social network is a great place for promoting content, your business, and most importantly yourself. But with over 150-million registered users, getting noticed can sometimes be a little tricky. Most of use recognise that merely filling out a profile isn’t going to cut it. As LinkedIn’s Nicole Williams notes “being part of an online community means engaging regularly to make an impact.” Knowing where to go beyond there though isn’t always easy. To try to make things a bit simpler, LinkedIn has released four tips for making sure you get noticed.

1. Sharing is caring
The social network reckons that people who share articles or content with their LinkedIn network at least once a week “are nearly ten times more likely to be contacted by a recruiter for new opportunities” than people who don’t.


It also recommends you as your network a question via your status update like “I’ve got a new business pitch with Nike tomorrow. Does anyone have any contacts over at Nike?”. Or make a general comment like “I’m heading to the airport for a client meeting in Denver.” Don’t go overboard though, quality counts for a lot more than quantity. It’s also worth remembering the nature of the platform. While your statuses on Facebook might reflect who you are as a person, every status update you share on LinkedIn is a reflection of who you are as a professional.

2. Create a schedule
LinkedIn suggests using its mobile and iPad apps if you’re having trouble fitting in time to spend on it. The apps are especially useful if you commute to work using public transport.


“Maybe a connection is going to be in the same city as you next week or someone is looking for a freelancer to help with her content development. You’ll know before you hit your desk,” it says.

Tips 3,4, and the complete article

How To Get A Job Before It’s Posted


Wednesday, November 20, 2013

7 LinkedIn Tips That Will Help You Get Hired

by Ta'Rikah Jones



More and more recruiters are using social media tools like LinkedIn to find the best candidates in the market.  As a graduate on the job hunt, it’s important to not only have an up-to-date resume but also an optimized LinkedIn profile in order to open doors and land that dream job.

Create an Attention-Grabbing Headline
No matter where they’re used, headlines are always the most important component to any piece of content because they are what grab the reader’s attention. LinkedIn allows 120 characters for a headline and these characters should be used to state what a candidate does as opposed to what they are. And it goes without saying that these headlines need to be enticing to get employers and recruiters to click on the profile.

Have an Appropriate Profile Picture

LinkedIn is a social media network for professionals to connect, not for friends and families to show off vacation photos. Having a professional headshot with a neutral background is the best way a candidate can present themselves to prospective employers. The photos should be warm and personable but always, always professional.

Keywords


Industry-relevant keywords used throughout a user profile help that profile be found higher within LinkedIn’s search rankings, which increases the likelihood the candidate’s profile will get noticed. It’s a good idea to use keywords specifically in the skills section since these sections will also come up in search queries as well.

Tips 4-7 and the complete article

Twitter Job Search Tips

by Social-Hire

Note: If this is your first time reading our twitter tips, you may also want to have a read of the articles "How To Tweet Your Way To A New Job" and "Your Essential Twitter Toolset". Both will help you to extract the maximum value from your twitter account.


Tactic 2 - Quickly Follow The Right Twitter Accounts To Further Your Job Search


The approaches we're recommending in these articles are specifically aimed at growing your social media connections for job search purposes, though actually they are relevant for anyone wanting to engage more effectively via social media.


One major challenge we hear candidates talk about is how to use their twitter account to engage effectively with recruiters and employers. Tips for doing this are covered in the job search articles I referenced above. Here and now we're going to focus purely on how to quickly grow the recruiter accounts you are following - whilst ensuring those you are following are relevant and engaged (and so can contribute to your job search endeavours).


What we have found to be an extremely effective approach is to identify Twitter lists that contain the types of recruiters / employers you would like to follow; and then, once followed, to use a twitter tool to cleanse your twitter account of anyone not engaging in a way that's going to be beneficial for your job search.


Following Twitter Accounts - Getting Started


To get you started, we would recommend using Listorious to research Twitter accounts to follow. You will see you can search for either individual Twitter accounts or for Twitter lists - so experiment with searches in your sector that include things like "recruiters", "hiring", "jobs" or "recruitment". You should quickly be able to find some relevant people to follow.


The next step is crucial though. For every person you see who looks like a relevant recruiter contact to follow, visit their twitter account profile page. Take a look at their lists, to see if they themselves manage lists of twitter accounts relevant to recruiting in that sector. You will find that many do. Alongside that, check to see the lists that that Twitter account is a member of. This is so powerful! Here you are using the power of crowdsourcing and the collective wisdom of the Twitter population to help you identify people who are worth following.


To get an idea of how this works, take a look at the link for Social-Hire's Founder Tony Restell. You will see that other Twitter users have determined that Tony is an authority on subjects like social media, job search and recruitment - and so have included him on their lists. Now imagine you've found the first recruiters whose twitter accounts you've decided to follow in your niche sector. Imagine your delight when you see that those recruiters feature on lists of other twitter accounts in the same field. Twitter lists can hold up to 500 twitter accounts. So this approach can very quickly see you following loads of twitter accounts highly relevant to your job search.


--- Search For Recruiters Now ---

Search by specialism (eg. strategy recruiter, sales recruiter) and / or by geography and / or by name of employer. 

Not registered yet? If you see someone you'd like to contact, simply register as a candidate (or register as a recruiter). Registering takes just seconds and allows you to contact members of the community discreetly and for free.
 

Cleansing Twitter Accounts From Your Following List


- Find out how to cleanse your twitter account and the complete article

Tuesday, November 19, 2013

6 Ways to Attract Recruiters to Your LinkedIn Profile

Stacey Politi

You know the drill. You’re unhappy in your current job — or unhappy with no job — and are desperately updating your LinkedIn profile that hasn’t been touched since the last time you were in this situation.

Well, you’re not alone; this sums up the dysfunctional relationship many professionals have with their LinkedIn profiles. While some flock to LinkedIn only when in need and apply to already posted positions, the platform is at its best when maintained regularly and optimized to allow hiring managers to reach out to you.

LinkedIn's career expert Nicole Williams helps elaborate on six ways to optimize your profile and attract more recruiters to you now.

1. Develop a Keyword Strategy

If search engine optimization is not your expertise, here is a mini lesson. LinkedIn’s search functionality makes it easy to find people by their name, skills and any other words that appear in their profile — which is why these words should be chosen with thought.

First, make a list of terms associated with your skills and experience. Ask yourself, "What words would someone search for to find me?" If strapped for terms, seek inspiration from a job positing you are interested in.

Next, take those terms and rework them from the perspective of a searching recruiter. For example, you may have the term "digital strategy" in your LinkedIn profile; however, a recruiter would be more likely to search for the term "digital strategist." Synonyms are also important; you never know if recruiters will search for "digital," "online" or "Internet," so include them all. Lastly, you want to organically incorporate these key terms into your profile to attract both the search engine and human reader alike.

2. Say Cheese

Williams says that "hiring managers are seven times more likely to view your profile if you have a photo; it’s a must have."

Not only does a photo allow your profile to stand out in the search results, but also shows recruiters that you are active on the network and LinkedIn is a viable way to contact you. Williams suggests using a photo that places you in the context of your job. You want to help hiring managers envision you in that position.

"If you are a chef, feel free to show yourself in a kitchen, or in front of a whiteboard if you are a marketer," Williams says. "But don’t use a picture of yourself with your dog, unless you’re a veterinarian."

3. Be Vain

Williams also prompts all passive and active job seekers to claim their vanity URL. This is a customized URL that drives directly to your profile.

"Using your name in your vanity URL gives it a chance to appear in a Google when someone searches for you," says Williams.

This makes it easier for hiring managers to find you and share your information with other hiring managers. If your preferred vanity URL is already claimed, incorporate a relevant key term, for example www.linkedin.com/in/CarlySimonSinger.

Ways 4-6 and the complete Mashable article

8 Quick & Easy Resume Tips You Can Use Now

by Shannon Smedstad

A friend of mine once said, “Everyone should know a good lawyer, accountant and resume writer.” And, amidst my group, I have been anointed the go-to person for all things resumes … which I love. When a dear friend’s husband was recently laid off, she quickly emailed me with a request to review it.

For those of us in the recruiting or career services industry, we keep up on all the resume dos and don’ts. But for typical job seekers — know matter how much information is posted online, how smart they are or what industry they are in — they are probably going to need some level of help improving their resumes.

8 QUICK AND EASY TIPS TO IMPROVE YOUR RESUME

1. Fix typos: When you are staring at your resume, hour after hour, often you start to glance over words and can miss a typo or two. Be sure to double and triple check each heading, sentence and word.

2. Retitle your resume: As an HR pro, I like seeing someone who has saved his or her resume with context. Instead of simply Jennifer Resume.doc, try something like Jennifer Smith PR Executive.doc.

3. Save a PDF version: A PDF version can help eliminate formatting issues that may occur when emailing your resume to someone using a different operating system. And, to me, the PDF just seems a bit more professional.


4. Add your LinkedIn profile: In today’s online world, having a digital presence is important. LinkedIn profiles — that are well written and include recommendations — can help enhance your flat, “paper” resume.
Tips 5-10 and the complete article

Monday, November 18, 2013

Six Reasons You’ve Failed the Interview Before It’s Even Over

Landing the interview for that dream job can be an exhilarating ride for anyone seeking a change in their career. The dizzy excitement of that chance of being so close can make anyone desperate to do well. However there are many cases in which those who really want to succeed have not, generally because of mistakes made before the interview has even finished.

It is common knowledge that an interviewee should give precise examples of previous work in relation to questions, maintain regular eye contact with their interviewer and arrive on time. However, there are other potential mistakes that you may not realise, which can be avoided.

“When a candidate comes in for an interview they are being assessed on everything, from posture to their industry knowledge.  When we interview a candidate, we have to take into account how our clients will perceive this person. At this stage of the process we are able to advise and help as much as possible, especially in areas they were previously unaware of, to give the candidate every chance of producing a good interview.” - Jenny Pape, Director at Workfish Recruitment

So what are those mistakes and what can you do to avoid them?


1) Preparation:

The most important aspect of the interview is the preparation that the candidate undertakes. Applicants can make their life a lot easier by making sure that they are well prepared before they even leave for the interview. For instance, those who are dedicated in their search for a new job can often have several interviews lined up at any one time. If those who are in this situation get confused or mix up interview dates, it can demonstrate poor organisational skills and can obviously be detrimental to interview success.

Another issue with preparation is interviewees looking like they have not had enough of a good sleep the night before. This can often be the case if they are anxious or worried about the interview – which is natural – after all an interview is a stressful time. However if the person turns up with rings around their eyes or starts to yawn in front of the interviewer, it can be pretty damaging.

2) Not impressing with your dressing:

It is amazing how many applicants really do not consider what they are wearing to an interview. There are those who really do turn up to an interview in just jeans and a t-shirt. This does not look professional to the interviewer and can seem like the interviewee has no real intention of pursuing the job. No matter how ‘cool’ or trendy the organisation is, it is always better to be overdressed than underdressed.It is not just dressing in the right clothes that can make the difference. Having the clothes freshly cleaned and professionally ironed is a huge benefit. Wearing a creased shirt or trousers shows poor organisation and a lack of personal care.

3) Arrival in the lobby:

How a candidate arrives in the lobby, or at the reception of the interviewing company, is just as important as how they introduce themselves to the interviewer. It is often forgotten that the receptionist is often asked what they noticed about the candidates. Turning up while using the mobile phone, chewing gum or wearing sunglasses – will be noticed, even if they are disposed off before the interviewer shows their presence.

Once the candidate has arrived in the lobby of the company – the best option will be to politely introduce themselves to the receptionist. It is best not to look at your phone but to instead sit and read either the notes on the company so they are fresh in your mind or any literature on the organisation that is present in the lobby.

It would be important to note at this time that being late is also frowned upon. However there are times when being late is not your fault. During these moments it is best to ring in advance to apologise, explain the reason succinctly without being negative.

Author: Josh Hansen writes on all manner of topics but can usually be found wittering on about the world of employment and technology, or both.

How to Conquer Your Job Search on LinkedIn in 15 Minutes a Day

Welcome to the busiest season of the year: schedules are filled with holiday shopping, end-of-year planning, get-togethers, winter weather prep, and so much more. It can be difficult to keep on top of your job search when the rest of life is so busy. My best advice is to create a simple, consistent job search schedule and stick to it. To get you started, here’s a sample schedule to help you master LinkedIn in just 15 minutes per day.

Monday
Start your week with a five-minute scan of the feed on your LinkedIn homepage. Your network may be sharing interesting articles and you may come across valuable insights from your chosen LinkedIn Today channels or the Influencers you follow. If you see an article that interests you, quickly skim it and click “like” to acknowledge the person who posted it.

Spend the next 10 minutes searching for jobs that are posted on LinkedIn. A recent study by Bright.com reported that Monday is the best day to look for a job, so don’t procrastinate! Many jobs allow you to apply using your LinkedIn profile, so you can quickly submit your application. If you’re a Job Seeker Premium subscriber, don’t forget to click “feature my application” so you can appear at the top of the list of job applicants for jobs where applications are collected on LinkedIn.

Tuesday
Scroll through your feed again for the first five minutes. This time, comment on the status updates of a few of your connections. Even a simple “Congratulations!” on a job change can nurture your relationships and help you stay top of mind, which may prompt others to review your profile and even recommend an opportunity they hear about.

Spend the next five minutes visiting your favorite LinkedIn Groups. Post some thoughts on a Featured Discussion or do a search on your area of interest and comment on a discussion related to that topic. To get the biggest return on your time investment, you can post a discussion yourself. Asking a simple, professionally relevant question generally attracts the most comments, such as “What is your favorite all-time marketing book?” or “What tech trends are you predicting for 2014?”

Take the last five minutes of your Tuesday to make sure your LinkedIn Inbox is clear. Respond to messages and connection requests to show people who reach out to you that you are eager to build and nurture your professional relationships.

Thursday, November 7, 2013

4 secrets to standing out on LinkedIn

By Samantha Collier

What separates the great LinkedIn profiles from the average ones is how people use all of the various features on LinkedIn. Of course, it’s also important to have a fully optimized profile.

But it’s not good enough to just fill out your profile anymore. You must do that pesky act we all talk about so often—engage.

The LinkedIn blog recently published an article about four ways to stand out on LinkedIn. Here’s the distilled version:

1. Status updates

LinkedIn users who share content with their LinkedIn networks at least once per week are nearly 10 times more likely to be contacted by a recruiter for new opportunities. News feeds are prominently displayed on home pages due to the recent LinkedIn upgrades. Take advantage of this by sharing articles, blog posts, third-party content, newsletters, etc. Remember, quality is key. And don’t over post either.

2. Schedule, schedule, schedule

Many professionals (including the attorneys with whom I work) don’t think they have the time to be active on LinkedIn. Because LinkedIn has a variety of smartphone and iPad apps, this can’t be your excuse anymore.

Create a schedule and stick to it. Remember, you have to repeat a new action a hundred times to create a new habit. Post updates to LinkedIn on the train to work in the morning, or when you have your morning coffee. When you do it is up to you but you need to stick with it.


Secrets 3,4, and the complete article

How The Informational Interview Helps You Get The Job

By

Anthony Moore has the things that old folks in old movies like ambitious young whippersnappers to have: moxie, pluck, spunk, and the like. He's a new college grad with, appropriately enough, a site for new college grads, and while he is yet to land his yearned-for dream job in "content writing," he is hustling up connections--the kind that, we know, land gigs.

How so? From a hard-earned nepotism begotten from attending an elite university? From being born into immense social standing? By creating a ridiculously great "I quit" YouTube hit? No: our Mr. Moore, as a good millennial does, engineers his own nepotism.

The secret: the informational interview.

Let's allow him to tell us what that means:
An informational interview is a meeting between two people, one who’s a professional working in a certain field or industry and one who’s looking to learn more about that industry and get their foot in the door.
Let's go over why informational interviews are awesome.

Surprisingly, informational interviews yield awesome information (and contacts)


When we talked to Bob Pozen last year, the former financial heavyweight, current Harvard Business School lecturer, and recent author of Extreme Productivity said that when you're on the job hunt (or planning for your career in general), the best way to get to know if you want to work in a field (without the full-on commitment of starting a job) is to simply talk to the people who do it.

Learn the parts that rock, the parts that suck, and the parts that are surprising. People love to read "what I wish I would have known when I was 22" blog posts; informational interviews allow you to pull that refracted reflectiveness out of the professionals that you have a job-crush on.

Additionally, you can ask these successful folks what skills they wish they had right now: like, say, a fluency in data or programming or visualization. Then we can look for gigs that let us grow those skill sets or not give a damn and and learn in-demand skills on our own time.

But the knowledge ain't the only thing. Because if the interview goes well, as Moore says, you'll now know somebody in the industry. Somebody that likes you, which is the way people land jobs.

Informational interviews let you get to know each other

As Northwestern management professor Lauren Rivera will tell you, hiring is much more like dating than a hiring manager might like to admit.

Folks tend to hire people who remind them of themselves, the people who they wouldn't mind being stuck with in an airport with, the people who they "click" with. The thing is, though, when we say we "click" with someone, that's a way of saying that you have same interests, background, and goals.

Additionally, when you do the interview you can get to know the personality (or psychographic, if you want to get pedantic) of the folks in organization or industry in question. Why is this important? The informational interview, then, is a way of ferreting out that "click" with a hiring manager. In a lightly Machiavellian sense, you could better learn to tailor your self-presentation to the hiring person's own self-perception.

Ok, so how do you do them?  Find out HOW and read the complete Fast Company article

Wednesday, November 6, 2013

4 Reasons You Might Not Get Recommendations On LinkedIn



It was easy to get recommendations when you were six. All you really needed was a pocketful of Jolly Ranchers (especially the watermelon kind). Kids you didn’t know were suddenly your friends. They told other kids about you and suddenly they were your friends, too. It was all fun and games until it got hot outside and the Jolly Ranchers got melty and sticky.

Now you’re a grownup, and a pocket full of Jolly Ranchers won’t do you much good, especially if you’re looking for a job. And the problem isn’t just that you can’t send Jolly Ranchers through the Internet. No, it’s more complicated than that.

Have you ever asked a LinkedIn Connection for a Recommendation and heard… nothing? They days turn into weeks, and you know darn well they’re active on LinkedIn because you see them in your feed? Frustrating, isn’t it? And confusing.

There’s any number of reasons, good and not-so-good, why your Connection may not have responded to your Recommendation request. Here are some reasons you might not get recommendations on LinkedIn:

1. He may not know how to respond to your Recommendation request.
It’s within the realm of possibility that your Connection is a bit of a luddite. Maybe he can do basic things LinkedIn – perhaps a friend helped him set up his profile. But when he got your Recommendation request, he didn’t know what to do. If you are certain this Recommendation is worth the time and effort for both of you, offer a lesson – screen shots via e-mail, possibly, or a visit to his office.

2. She honestly may have forgotten.
Maybe she is in the middle of a big project at work, or maybe she’s overwhelmed for other reasons. If you have every reason to believe this person would give you a good recommendation, it’s okay to send a reminder message or e-mail, “Hey, did you forget…?” You can also send your request again.
  • Go to your Settings and enter your password.
  • Click “Manage your recommendations.”
  • Find the position you’ve requested the recommendation for and click “Manage.”
  • Find the person you want to remind and click on “Resend” next to her name.
  • Edit the message and hit send. I put in an extra “Just a polite reminder :-)” at the top.

5 Benefits of Finding Work Through a Temp Agency

Posted by Jeff Kells

Some people still have an outdated view of a temp job. They think that a temp job is something you take to make ends meet while you’re looking for a “real” job. That kind of thinking ignores the many benefits that a temp job can offer. If you’re considering a temp job, but can’t quite shake that old-fashioned viewpoint, here are some benefits of a temp job that may change your mind.

1. Take Charge of Your Time

Everyone has different demands put on their time. You may be a student, have family obligations, or just need some personal time before starting a long-term career. A temp job gives you the flexibility to work full- or part-time, without making any long-term commitments to an employer. Since you get to choose which assignments you take, you decide how much of your time is devoted to working, and how much is free for other obligations.

2. Keep Your Skills Sharp

Whether you’re taking time off for personal reasons, or having trouble finding the perfect job, blank periods on a resume look bad. A temp job lets you continue developing job skills and building your resume, all on your terms. When you do decide that the time is right to continue pursuing a long-term career, you won’t have blank spots on your resume holding you back.

3. Expand Your Network


Working a temp job gives you access to a huge number of professional contacts. Everyone from recruiters to employers can potentially help you advance your career. Even your coworkers and fellow temps can prove to be valuable resources. Just one or two temp jobs could provide you with the kind of contact list that other professionals spend decades putting together.

Benefits 4,5, and the complete article

Tuesday, November 5, 2013

A 10-Step Recruiting Process: Where Do You Fall Out?

by Todd Herschberg

As a recruiter and mentor, I get dozens of applications for every opening; I have to find a way to thin the piles down to a reasonable size – and select those who deserve a shot.

So before you  tell everyone you’ve found your dream job and have applied, let me describe the ten steps I use to determine if you may be selected as the 1-in-100 “winner” of this competition…
Candidates received: 100

Step 1: Are you Social?

In my business, being alive on social media is everything. You can have a smallish personal network, but it must be of high quality and you must be a consistent, integrity-based practitioner of the social media arts.
Candidates remaining: 40

Step 2: Do you Pay Attention to Detail?

For instance, I asked for a cover letter describing why you felt that you would be a great fit for the position. Yet, a surprisingly large number of applicants fail to include a cover letter. In addition, a handful sent cover letters that were clearly form letters that failed to include the information requested.
20 candidates remaining

Step 3: How Good is Your Cover Letter?

I know others think different, but to me a cover letter is always important, especially for college students who may not yet have a rich work history. Here is your chance to shine, to show me a bit about who you are as a person:
  • Typo? Or maybe too long? If so, you may not be good at Step 2 or getting ideas across in a succinct manner; you go into the “probably not” pile
  • Is your cover letter engaging and provide reasons for me to bring you in? Did you address it “Dear Todd” as opposed to “To whom it may concern”? If yes, into the “for consideration” pile.
Candidates remaining (those who shine): 15

Step 4: Is your Resume Compelling?

Here’s where I really decide on those I’ll be interviewing…

Have you committed yourself to internships? Have you been involved in activities outside of class? Volunteer work? Summer jobs? Peer mentoring? I am not looking for anything in particular, but I do want my interns and team members to be well-rounded individuals versus academic automatons.

Candidates remaining: 10


See steps 5-10 and the complete article


About the Author: Todd Herschberg is a seasoned entrepreneur who has served as founder, marketer, technologist and mentor for a number of start-up tech firms. Mr. Herschberg is one of the world’s 20 most connected individuals on LinkedIn, a frequent speaker on social media topics and ranked the 33rd “Most Influential Person Online” by Fast Company. Todd is also an advisor to YouTern and a firm believer in mentoring. You can reach Todd directly on Twitter.

Job Seekers: Polish Your LinkedIn Profile - Tips, Techniques, and Advice

Lisa Quast

As the use of social media in the hiring process has grown in popularity over the last several years, recruiters and hiring managers aren’t hiding from it. In fact, they’re using technology tools such as LinkedIn as a pre-interview tactic to narrow down candidates for job openings.

To find out what they’re looking for, I interviewed technology recruiters and HR experts. Based on their comments, you might decide it’s time to polish your LinkedIn profile.

What’s important to hiring managers/recruiters
Screening a LinkedIn profile is similar to screening a resume. “The candidate initially gets about 30 seconds of my time to entice me to keep reading,” says Jennifer Olsen, president of Resourceful HR“The most important thing I look for is relevant experience compared to my open position. Providing testimonials and endorsements that further support that experience also helps me know that the candidate is serious about the information they are trying to convey.”

Because reviewers give candidates only a short amount of time to catch their attention, the Background Summary section is critical. “Job seekers should post a thorough Summary about their professional experience and what they’re trying to sell or market about themselves to prospective employers,” recommends Amy Giustino, regional managing director at Resources Global Professionals.

Telling your work “story” is also important. “The candidate’s profile should clearly present their experience and how they have progressed throughout their career, including the use of easily understood titles,” says Cindy Olsen, VP of HR at Concur Technologies.

Turn-offs when viewing candidates’ profiles
One of the biggest negatives of everyone I interviewed was an incomplete profile. “If a candidate doesn’t complete their profile with their relevant experience, it makes it hard to determine their qualifications when recruiting,” says Jason Woolwine, senior recruiter at Apptio, Inc.

Another issue is when the online profile doesn’t match the person’s resume, such as different dates, job titles, job descriptions or education. “We see it happen all the time and it raises some red flags,” Woolwine says.

“We are turned off by candidates who don’t have a complete job history, who didn’t give a brief description of their responsibilities in each position or who indicated they aren’t looking for new opportunities,” adds TJ Floyd, managing partner at Prodigy Resources. Floyd recommends that candidates “keep their profiles updated and indicate whether or not they want to hear about new opportunities.”

More tips, information, and the complete Forbes article

Monday, November 4, 2013

Will You Shine in a Job Interview? - Score Yourself - 9 Tips

By

In today's tough job market, good may not be good enough. Will you be stellar in a job interview? Rate yourself on each these:

1. Researching the boss and employer. For example, Google your boss, the organization and if appropriate, its products, services and competitors. But don't reveal too much during the interview. Having taken the time to learn a tremendous amount about the organization or boss can make you seem desperate, even creepy.
Your score from 0 to 15: ___

2. Planning for the compensation question. In many interviews, the candidate is asked, "What's your salary requirement?" Sure, you can try responding with, "What range have you budgeted for the position?" But often, you'll be forced to give your range.

To get an estimate of your fair market value, use websites such as Glassdoor.com, PayScale.com and Salary.com, plus information from your colleagues. Adjust based on how good you'd be at the position and on how badly you want the job.
Your score from 0 to 15: ___

3. Looking the part. Dress one notch dressier than what you would wear on that job. Not sure what that is? Email or call the office and ask, "I'm coming in for a job interview for a position as X. I'm getting interviewed by Y. Any advice on what to wear?"
Your score from 0 to 10: ___

4. Having compelling yet honest answers ready for The Four Questions:
i. "Could you tell me about yourself?" In just one minute, you need to make clear why you'd be a great person for the job.

ii. "What's your greatest weakness? Some employers are now using a variation of that: "What do you suck most at?" The informality makes you more likely to respond honestly.

iii. "Could you tell me about a problem you solved?" You need a one-minute story that showcases how your skills, ability or drive would be valuable in your target job.

iv. The question you fear most. Of course, it's different for each applicant. Examples: "Why did you leave your previous employer?" "Why have you been unemployed so long?" Or it may be a technical question that would reveal that your skills for the job are marginal.  Your score from 0 to 20: ___

See your final score, what it means, and all 9 tips

Answers to 17 LinkedIn Questions You Were Too Ashamed to Ask

by Amanda Sibley


Common Questions About LinkedIn Followers and LinkedIn Connections

12) Do the people who you personally connect with automatically become followers of your company page?

Your connections are personal connections associated with your personal LinkedIn profile. Followers of a company page are not the same. Followers must click the “Follow” button at the top right of your company page. Followers also do not need confirmation like connections do.

13) How do you get more followers to your company page?

Put LinkedIn follow buttons on your website pages to help drive relevant traffic to your company page, link to your company page in blog posts and in emails you send, and include social share buttons on all pieces of content you create. You can also link to your company page on other social media networks.
But most of all, a popular LinkedIn Company Page comes from a steady stream of high quality content that helps the follower-base, and ideally, prompts discussion.

Common Questions About LinkedIn Analytics

15) What are "clicks," "impressions," and "engagement" of company page posts?

Each company page post gives you metrics to help you determine which post does best. "Clicks" refer to the number of people who click on your post, either to view the content or to come to your company page. "Impressions" refer to the number of eyeballs on your company page post, either in their newsfeed or on your company page. One person can account for more than one impression. "Engagement" is the collective number of likes, comments, shares, and clicks, divided by impressions -- it's given to you as an engagement rate. This shows you if you post was engaging to your followers.

Common Questions About LinkedIn Company Pages

1) Is a LinkedIn Company Page free?

Yes! You can create a company page for your business for free. 

4) Can you manage more than one company page?

You can be the administrator of more than one company page. In order to do this, you must be associated with the company in your current job section on your personal LinkedIn profile, and have a company email address that is a unique domain. For example, our unique domain is <name>@hubspot.com.