Thursday, December 19, 2013

Don’t Be THAT Guy: 6 Job Search Behaviors to Avoid

by Glassdoor

You’ve heard it a million times… the job market is competitive, and the economy still uncertain. In that environment it’s tough to maintain your poise and hope as a job seeker, right?

With that said, you can take targeted, positive and actionable steps to create positive results for yourself. Below, we’ve listed six unhealthy job search habits that will make your job search more difficult. So, avoid these…

1. Staying in Your Pajamas All Day

2. Being Constantly Plugged In

3. Badgering or Annoying People


Steps To Get Noticed On LinkedIn By Recruiters - LinkedIn Advice

by

It’s true. Recruiters from both private businesses and recruiting agencies scour LinkedIn all the time to find business professionals passively or actively seeking work. Job boards like Monster and Career Builder are great, but what you may not know is that many high end recruiters use LinkedIn to find the best of the best. The job boards are sometimes full of actively seeking candidates which can be a little overwhelming to some recruiters. LinkedIn allows a recruiter to work at the pace of their open orders and take their time to find the candidates they are looking for.


I won’t get into how they use it just yet, but I want to share some tips on how to get your LinkedIn profile noticed by recruiters:

Use a keyword strategy.

Promote yourself!

Be active!

Read the complete SteamFeed article for more tips and how to implement those tips


Wednesday, December 18, 2013

How To Create A LinkedIn Profile That Will Actually Benefit Your Career



Let’s get one thing straight. If you are in business, you need to be on LinkedIn. This is also true if you want to be in business. Meaning, if you are in school… now is the PERFECT time to get started on LinkedIn.

No matter where you are in your career, NOW is the time to spend some time ensuring your LinkedIn profile perfectly describes you, your goals, your accomplishments and what you bring to the table.
Your goal should be to help the reader decide:

Do I want to do business with this person?

There should be no debate about this point. Your career may depend upon it.

There is nothing wrong with Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Google+ or any other social networks. It’s just that LinkedIn is the place to be for business.

Why LinkedIn? - find out why, how, and the complete elitedaily article

13 Holiday Job Search Networking Tips You Need To Know



Holiday Networking ‘Naughty’ Tactics To Avoid

1. Focusing only on your search needs.


2. Asking for jobs, information, or leads without first offering to give one or more of the same first. 


Holiday Networking ‘Nice’ Strategies

1. Attending a wide variety of holiday events and be prepared to make connections. 


2. Asking for jobs, information, or leads without first offering to give one or more of the same first. 
Read more at http://www.careerealism.com/holiday-networking-strategies/#5zkB60FS58gSGQrv.99

Tuesday, December 17, 2013

12 Fast-Growing, High-Paying Jobs In 2014

What are the hottest jobs of 2014?

CareerBuilder teamed up with Economic Modeling Specialists Intl. (EMSI) to identify the occupations that grew by at least 7% from 2010 to 2013, are projected to grow in 2014, and pay at least $22 per hour.

1. Software Developers, Applications and Systems Software

2. Market Research Analysts and Marketing Specialists

3. Training and Development Specialists

How To Write A LinkedIn Profile When You’re Unemployed - LinkedIn Advice

How To Write A LinkedIn Profile When You’re Unemployed

1. Your Headline

2. Your Summary

3. Your Experience



Monday, December 16, 2013

6 Tips for Staying Flexible in Your Job Search

By

Wouldn't it be great if everything just stayed the same for awhile? It is tiring to have to learn how to use a new smartphone or figure out the latest gadget. In a world that changes quickly, you have to learn to keep morphing, adjusting and adapting to stay current and marketable. The job search is all about adapting and adjusting to yield positive results.

1) Your career is in beta mode.
2) Master more than you think you need.
3) The résumé isn't dead…yet.
4) More mixed signals on résumés.
5) Try, try and try again.
6) Change your outlook.

Read the full US News article

Tips for Creating a LinkedIn Profile that Gets Noticed

Tips for Creating a LinkedIn Profile that Gets Noticed - Read the PersonalBrandingBlog Post

Wednesday, December 11, 2013

5 Ways To Keep Your LinkedIn Profile Active And Relevant - LinkedIn Advice

By

Keeping your LinkedIn profile active is a lot like keeping a baseball glove worn-in and ready to use. When I was growing up playing baseball, my dad always told me to oil up my glove and use it regularly. Otherwise, it would get stiff and make it hard to catch fly balls and grounders. Catching these fly balls and grounders would be critical in a game to maintain the favor and friendship of my teammates! Little did I know my dad was teaching me a LinkedIn lesson in the 1970′s!
Screen Shot 2013-10-19 at 4.59.21 PM
An active LinkedIn profile is similar to that glove. If you don’t keep it active, then you will not be regularly connecting with your network, and, therefore, might fall out of favor of your constituency!
Here are 5 easy ways to keep your LinkedIn profile “oiled” up to you can catch all of your opportunities!

5 Ways To Keep Your LinkedIn Profile Active And Relevant

  • Update your LinkedIn status once or twice daily; once at the beginning of the day and another at the end of the day. Factbrowser reports that 77% of LinkedIn members use the site to research people and companies, 69% to reconnect with past business associates and 50% to build new networks, so regular updates will help you get found! If it sounds like this scheduling and updating is a lot of work, it’s not. Use a tool like HootSuite to schedule your twice-daily updates from curated sources, like the Wall Street Journal or MarketingThink.com. This tool makes it easier to plan your communication strategy from the comfort of your couch! (No … two daily updates are not too much. No one has EVER complained about my volume of updates!)
  • Participate in 3-5 key LinkedIn groups 2-3 times a week. LinkedIn reports hosting 1.5 million groups, however, you can only join 50 of them. Even with 50 groups to join, you will never be able to activity engage in all of them. So, pick the most relevant ones and maintain a contributing and consultative presence. Your contribution formula should be 10 consultative posts for every 1 “sales-ish” post. Participating in 3-5 LinkedIn groups can get hectic, too. You don’t have to log into LinkedIn every time you check on a group since you can use tools like Flipboard and HootSuite to check the activity.

  • Own the conversation in 1 key LinkedIn group. It’s easy to commit to trying to be an expert, thought leader, or active participant in one group; hopefully one that is thriving and full of other great contacts and potential business for you. Active participation in a group like this will increase the likelihood a growing LinkedIn network, and we all know that a bigger network is a better network!

8 Job Search Goals Before The End Of The Year - Job Search Advice


Tuesday, December 10, 2013

14 Steps To Improve Your LinkedIn Presence In 2014 - LinkedIn Advice

Cheryl Conner

Contributor William Arruda gave Forbes readers good reasons last week to give LinkedIn a much more serious look in 2014.

Now that Arruda has covered the “why” of updating your profile, I’d like to take a closer look at the “how.” So I’ve reconnected with Wayne Breitbarth, the LinkedIn consultant and author behind the LinkedIn user research in the Forbes Most Read article I presented last month.


Whether you’re a power user or a casual LinkedIn participant so far, here are the 14 straightforward things Wayne suggested to me that are within the reach of every one of us as we bring the current business year to a close. Practice the ongoing steps and by the time the New Year arrives, you can have them committed to a habit you can conduct in just 10 minutes a day, if possible. But even 1-2 times a week could put you well ahead of the typical curve.  

Here are the 14 steps he suggests you take right away:

1.     Update your photo.  Your picture should be recent, professional, and recognizable. An extra tip from Contributor Ken Krogue: Make the photo black and white—since the majority of the photos are in color, the black and white choice will help to set you apart from the crowd.

2.     Craft a killer Headline.  These are the most important 120 characters on your profile and should include your most important keywords and a short version of your branding story or elevator speech.

3.     Revisit your Summary.  Think of a tone and style akin to having a cup of coffee with the people who visit your profile. Your description should make them want to pursue a lasting business relationship with you. Would you want to know the person you see in your description, or do you sound entirely self-focused? Now’s the time to give it a bit of thought.

4.     Insert a call to action in your profile.  Don’t assume readers of your profile know what to do next to find out more about you and your products or services. Be specific and share a link or document that will help them move another step closer to a meeting, phone call, or request to connect on LinkedIn.

5.     Join 50 groups.  Well, consider at least joining 10. With more than 1.8 million to choose from, you have the opportunity to increase your relevancy, find new people to join your network, and send direct messages to thousands of people who are not in your direct network. To avoid “email overload,” adjust each group’s contact settings to your liking.

Avoid These 10 Job Hunting Mistakes - Job Search Advice

Heather Hawkins

If you’ve been on the job hunt for any length of time, you know how frustrating it can be if you seem to “hit a wall” with a particular hiring manager. You may even feel like all the jobs you’ve applied to have begun to blur together and you can’t tell one hiring manager from the next.

So imagine what it must be like for the hiring managers themselves. Especially in this economy, when there may sometimes be hundreds of applicants for a single open position, it may be difficult to tell applicants apart. But one thing is certain. There are some mistakes that get the attention of hiring managers, mistakes you can’t afford to make if you hope to find a good job.

SavvySugar put together this list of 10 things hiring managers hate about you to help you avoid some common pitfalls that hiring managers everywhere are tired of seeing. Check it out!

Thesaurus Overload

You can create a resume that sounds intelligent without using words bigger than you. Use the thesaurus for keyword inspiration and variations, but leave out the words that sound like you’re trying too hard.

Being Too Negative

Do ask about why the person who used to fill the position left the job, but don’t ask about the most common complaint about the job. That’s completely subjective anyway and makes a negative impression.

When You’re a Pushy Patty

Persistence is only a virtue if it’s not irritating, so hold back on the aggressive follow-ups. Getting in touch with the hiring manager excessively makes you seem desperate.

Not Managing Your Online Profile

How many times do they have to say it? Hiring managers will look up all of your online profiles, and yes, they will look through your pictures. Don’t be a disappointment and waste their time; clean up your online presence. 

Mistakes 5-10 and the complete article

Monday, December 9, 2013

The Ultimate Cheat Sheet for Mastering LinkedIn - LinkedIn Advice

by Pamela Vaughan

Optimizing Your LinkedIn Presence

1) Claim your vanity URL.

Make your profile look more professional and easier to share by claiming your LinkedIn vanity URL. Instead of a URL with a million confusing numbers at the end, it will look nice and clean like this: http://www.linkedin.com/in/pamelavaughan. Do so by going here and clicking "customize your public profile URL" down on the right-hand side.

2) Create a profile badge for your personal website.

If you have your own personal website or blog, you can promote your personal LinkedIn presence and help grow your professional network by adding a Profile Badge that links to your public LinkedIn profile. LinkedIn has a few different badge designs to select from, and you can configure your own here.

3) Make your blog/website links sexier.

websites
Instead of using the default "My Website"-type anchor text links in your LinkedIn profile, you can change the anchor text to make those links more appealing to people who view your profile. So if you want to increase clicks on the website links you can display on your profile, change the link's anchor text to something more attention-grabbing than the standard options LinkedIn provides. For example, if you want to include a link to your blog, rather than choosing LinkedIn's standard "Blog" anchor text, customize it to include keywords that indicate what your blog is about, like "Internet Marketing Blog." Each profile can display up to 3 website links like this, and they can be customized by editing your profile, clicking edit on your website links, and selecting "Other" in the drop-down menu to customize the anchor text.

Tips 4,5, and the complete article



5 Reasons You Shouldn’t Freeze Your Job Search During The Holidays - Job Search Advice

Laura Smith-Proulx


Planning to hold off on job searching until January? Think employers don’t hire during the holiday months? You’re mistaken if you believe companies quit looking for talent this time of year.

While plenty of people start to back off on job searching in November and December, you can benefit from continuing to put time and effort into your hunt for a great opportunity. Consider these five significant reasons you’ll miss out (big time) if you freeze your job search during the holidays:

1. Employers Are (Still!) Hiring
Just like any other part of the business, hiring still goes on late in the year. Operations, mergers, production, orders, service, buyouts, and projects are always running in most companies.

In fact, some industries may even have more significant needs during the holiday season, as major transactions and deals are often negotiated during what others might consider downtime.

Back in my IT management and recruiting days, we focused more on January projects and planning for resource needs than holiday vacations.

If your expertise includes acquisitions, sales, manufacturing oversight, or technology automation, you could be in particularly high demand as a skilled leader or executive (even more so at this time of year).

2. Budget Requirements Must Be Met
Both end-of-year budgets and new-year headcount forecasting can drive hiring during the holiday season.

For example, a company may have just received approval to hire a new Director of IT in January. When will they most likely start the hiring cycle? December.

The typical hiring cycle for an executive can take weeks, if not months. Employers anticipating the need for new sales leaders, for example, may need to initiate their hiring process by the end of the year to get a new hire onboarded by February.

Therefore, sending your newly polished leadership resume out to companies of interest to you can pay off quickly, especially if they’re in a hiring cycle and you’re the most qualified –and interested – applicant.

Wednesday, December 4, 2013

9 Reasons You Didn't Get Called for the Second Job Interview

Jay Webb

One of the biggest grievances I hear from job seekers after they weren’t called back for a second interview, is the lack of constructive criticism or candid interview feedback. They feel as though the interview went well, often very well, yet they never hear from the person they spoke to or met with again.

Here are 9 reasons why you may not have been called back for the second interview:


  1. You did not answer the questions that were being asked. I think that some job seekers are participating in an entirely different interview than the one that’s actually taking place.
  2. You didn’t look the part or dress for the culture.  Research the culture of the company. Are they more conservative and traditional, or progressive and laid back? 
  3. Your hands were clammy and you gave an overall vibe of nervousness.  No matter how badly you want the position, you must and SHOULD remain cool—–assuming it’s not your first sales position.
  4. Poor hygiene. Pay attention to the details. Are your fingernails groomed properly? Do you have too much neck hair?  What about your breath?

Tuesday, December 3, 2013

25 Tips to Rock LinkedIn

At the recent New Start Scotland Exhibition event, as part of the NSDesign social media suite of workshops, I was asked to present something. I chose the ten-year old platform of LinkedIn as my subject. Since several people asked for a copy of the “slides” after it, I thought I’d create a blog post instead.

I started off with some background comments, and by recommending that people turn off their notifications BEFORE embarking on any tweaking of their profiles. Then asked people what their actual “GOAL” is for social media. Like every other platform out there, LI works best when you have a strategy in place. You need measurable goals that you’re actually working toward or what’s the point in being on there?

What I presented was both a matter of opinion (my own opinion of course), and a variety of “best practices” too. I probably read an average of one LinkedIn article a day. I added a disclaimer that basically said that I wasn’t claiming my profile was “the best profile ever” – to be honest, it’s a constant work in progress. As I learn more, I adjust it.

Here we go!
1) A profile picture (minimum 200×200; max 500×500). Ensure it’s not left blank, or a logo in its place. It shouldn’t be a “selfie” from a night out with your pals, or one with your spouse or kids. Make it a professional studio “headshot” if at all possible. People want to see who they’re dealing with. Put your best foot forward. Profiles with pictures are said to be viewed seven times more often than ones that don’t have a profile picture. Get the picture!? (Pun intended).

2) Make a Headline that Shines (120 characters). If you don’t change it, your headline will simply be your current job title. Why not change it to include relevant keywords for search engine optimization? Google and LinkedIn seem to share a good symbiotic relationship. So if you do it right, by that I mean choosing the right words, you just may find that you can rank on page one in Google by changing your headline to reflect the right terms. Try to show the benefit of connecting to you to your potential (and current) contacts.

3) Succinct Summary (2000 max characters). To me, this isn’t the place to write your full life story or bullet point your full career, but perhaps an opportunity to show who you are in a more rounded sense. Give the reader a little insight into who you are – not just what you DO. Be authentic, use keywords, show some personality, and don’t forget some sort of call to action at the end of it.

4) URLS (30 characters). There are two areas in your profile that you should take advantage of:
A. Your customized URL (usually this is your name). Your URL is found right below your photo on LinkedIn. (See right). Click edit and make it meaningful!
Thankfully, for me, there is only one Thea Newcomb! (Accept no substitutes). :)

B. Anchor Text/ Back Links The other areas you want to claim are your various website links. These are in the “contact info” area of your profile, and they’ll say things like “Company Website” or “Personal Website”. You can choose from Blog, Company Website, Portfolio, etc.
Update your URL on Linkedin
If you choose “Other” you can then tell people what the name of the site is. Like everywhere else on your LinkedIn profile, use those relevant keywords! I can’t believe how many profiles I see out there where it’s not been used properly. It’s another place for SEO juice, as it were, so please take advantage of it and give the link a relevant name!


5) Experience and Education Put your high school, college, university, and any business training or certification on there too. When writing your experience out, be sure to expand on the title and company, and avoid just highlighting your whole resume verbatim. It’s boring. Strike a happy balance between not telling too much and leaving it sparse.

10 Things to Do This Week for Your Job Search


Even if you’re not job searching today, it makes sense to be prepared to job hunt.  You may decide it’s time to say goodbye to your current job. Your employer may decide you’re no longer needed. You never know for certain what might transpire at work.

On average, people change jobs 11 times during their career, so it’s going to happen at some point. It’s better to be prepared than to have to job hunt in panic mode. Here are 10 things you can do to help ensure you’re ready to get hired.

Have a professional development plan in place.  Identify skills, areas of knowledge or proficiency with technology which will give you an edge in the job market.  Make sure you can always tell a prospective employer about assets which you are currently developing.

Maintain an up-to-date LinkedIn profile which incorporates your latest accomplishments.

Make sure your resume is current so there will be no delay if you move into job search mode.  Redo your resume if the focus is on responsibilities rather than accomplishments and value added. Employers are now focusing on candidates who can generate the best results. Review resume samples and advice on updating your resume.


Make sure you have references ready to go should you need them.  A good tactic is to bolster your LinkedIn recommendations and endorsements.  Write recommendations for other LinkedIn contacts and endorse their skills.  Some of these individuals will reciprocate or, at the least, you will feel more comfortable asking them for a recommendation.

Things 5-10 and the complete About.com article

Monday, December 2, 2013

9 Reasons Why You Must Update Your LinkedIn Profile Today

William Arruda

Over the past decade, LinkedIn has become an essential personal branding tool. It has never been more important to build and maintain a stellar LinkedIn profile. The virtual professional network has morphed from an online resume and networking site to a comprehensive personal branding resource. Here are nine eye-opening reasons why you need to polish your LinkedIn profile right now!


1. It has millions of members. With over 225 million members, LinkedIn is the world’s largest professional network. Today, it’s assumed that you have a LinkedIn profile. If you don’t have one, can you be taken seriously as a career-minded executive? Brand-conscious leaders don’t turn their backs on two hundred million prospects.

2. It shows up at the top of Google searches. When someone googles you, your LinkedIn profile will likely show up in the first or second spot – that’s some powerful Google juice! This is important because, according to a Gravitate Online study of over 8 million clicks, more than 94% of users clicked on the first page results while fewer than 6% clicked to the second page. The first and second positions get 50% of all clicks.

3. People are researching you. All kinds of people use all kinds of ways to learn about you. LinkedIn gives you an opportunity to control what they discover about your strengths and, more important, about your brand. Who are these people? People you know. People who want to know you. People who matter: Your prospects, employees, manager, clients, competitors. They all use LinkedIn to learn about others. They search for you before meeting you for the first time, or after reading an article that you were featured in, or when deciding whether to respond to your email.

4. It’s packed with invaluable resources. LinkedIn helps you expand your success by offering crucial connections and expertise. Need to source staff? Want to solve problems that can’t be solved by the people in your company? Need to open doors with clients or partners? Need a service provider referral? Want to research what the competition is doing? Need to see who’s in a prospective client’s network? LinkedIn puts all of these assets at your fingertips.

Reasons 5-9 and the complete Forbes article

How to Answer “Tell Us About Yourself ” – 4 Interview Tips

By

“So then….Tell us About Yourself…..” Despite being one of the most frequently asked questions at interview and many interviews actually opening with this very question, many candidates do not pay as much attention to how they answer this question as perhaps they should.

Don’t be fooled into thinking that this is simply a nice little opener for the interviewer or that it is asked before the “real” questions begin. How you answer this question can determine from the off what impression the interviewer has of you. To help you out, we have put together some basic top tips on how to answer “Tell us about yourself”…

Be Prepared
Just as you spend time researching the company and preparing answers for the “difficult “ questions, you should prepare your answer for this too. Don’t simply leave it until you are asked and then randomly waffle. Spend some time before your interview and prepare a biographical type statement all about yourself – your experience and your professional strengths and qualifications. Write it down, go over it and rewrite it until you are sure that it is truly giving an accurate and positive impression of what you are all about.

Be Brief

An all too common mistake when answering this question is to talk too much, to waffle or to ramble on without actually saying anything of real value. This is where your preparation will help. You should ensure that you can answer this question in just a couple of lines. Be specific and simply summarise what you have done to date that relates directly to the job in question and finish by mentioning exactly why you have applied for this position. Don’t be tempted to go on and on talking about yourself. The longer you do this, the more the interviewer will lose interest.


Tips 3,4, and the complete article


Thursday, November 21, 2013

LinkedIn’s 4 tips for getting people to notice you

By

Look, we all know that LinkedIn is incredibly important. That it’s gone beyond being an online CV is obvious. It’s also much more than just a place for making online business connections.

The professional social network is a great place for promoting content, your business, and most importantly yourself. But with over 150-million registered users, getting noticed can sometimes be a little tricky. Most of use recognise that merely filling out a profile isn’t going to cut it. As LinkedIn’s Nicole Williams notes “being part of an online community means engaging regularly to make an impact.” Knowing where to go beyond there though isn’t always easy. To try to make things a bit simpler, LinkedIn has released four tips for making sure you get noticed.

1. Sharing is caring
The social network reckons that people who share articles or content with their LinkedIn network at least once a week “are nearly ten times more likely to be contacted by a recruiter for new opportunities” than people who don’t.


It also recommends you as your network a question via your status update like “I’ve got a new business pitch with Nike tomorrow. Does anyone have any contacts over at Nike?”. Or make a general comment like “I’m heading to the airport for a client meeting in Denver.” Don’t go overboard though, quality counts for a lot more than quantity. It’s also worth remembering the nature of the platform. While your statuses on Facebook might reflect who you are as a person, every status update you share on LinkedIn is a reflection of who you are as a professional.

2. Create a schedule
LinkedIn suggests using its mobile and iPad apps if you’re having trouble fitting in time to spend on it. The apps are especially useful if you commute to work using public transport.


“Maybe a connection is going to be in the same city as you next week or someone is looking for a freelancer to help with her content development. You’ll know before you hit your desk,” it says.

Tips 3,4, and the complete article

How To Get A Job Before It’s Posted


Wednesday, November 20, 2013

7 LinkedIn Tips That Will Help You Get Hired

by Ta'Rikah Jones



More and more recruiters are using social media tools like LinkedIn to find the best candidates in the market.  As a graduate on the job hunt, it’s important to not only have an up-to-date resume but also an optimized LinkedIn profile in order to open doors and land that dream job.

Create an Attention-Grabbing Headline
No matter where they’re used, headlines are always the most important component to any piece of content because they are what grab the reader’s attention. LinkedIn allows 120 characters for a headline and these characters should be used to state what a candidate does as opposed to what they are. And it goes without saying that these headlines need to be enticing to get employers and recruiters to click on the profile.

Have an Appropriate Profile Picture

LinkedIn is a social media network for professionals to connect, not for friends and families to show off vacation photos. Having a professional headshot with a neutral background is the best way a candidate can present themselves to prospective employers. The photos should be warm and personable but always, always professional.

Keywords


Industry-relevant keywords used throughout a user profile help that profile be found higher within LinkedIn’s search rankings, which increases the likelihood the candidate’s profile will get noticed. It’s a good idea to use keywords specifically in the skills section since these sections will also come up in search queries as well.

Tips 4-7 and the complete article

Twitter Job Search Tips

by Social-Hire

Note: If this is your first time reading our twitter tips, you may also want to have a read of the articles "How To Tweet Your Way To A New Job" and "Your Essential Twitter Toolset". Both will help you to extract the maximum value from your twitter account.


Tactic 2 - Quickly Follow The Right Twitter Accounts To Further Your Job Search


The approaches we're recommending in these articles are specifically aimed at growing your social media connections for job search purposes, though actually they are relevant for anyone wanting to engage more effectively via social media.


One major challenge we hear candidates talk about is how to use their twitter account to engage effectively with recruiters and employers. Tips for doing this are covered in the job search articles I referenced above. Here and now we're going to focus purely on how to quickly grow the recruiter accounts you are following - whilst ensuring those you are following are relevant and engaged (and so can contribute to your job search endeavours).


What we have found to be an extremely effective approach is to identify Twitter lists that contain the types of recruiters / employers you would like to follow; and then, once followed, to use a twitter tool to cleanse your twitter account of anyone not engaging in a way that's going to be beneficial for your job search.


Following Twitter Accounts - Getting Started


To get you started, we would recommend using Listorious to research Twitter accounts to follow. You will see you can search for either individual Twitter accounts or for Twitter lists - so experiment with searches in your sector that include things like "recruiters", "hiring", "jobs" or "recruitment". You should quickly be able to find some relevant people to follow.


The next step is crucial though. For every person you see who looks like a relevant recruiter contact to follow, visit their twitter account profile page. Take a look at their lists, to see if they themselves manage lists of twitter accounts relevant to recruiting in that sector. You will find that many do. Alongside that, check to see the lists that that Twitter account is a member of. This is so powerful! Here you are using the power of crowdsourcing and the collective wisdom of the Twitter population to help you identify people who are worth following.


To get an idea of how this works, take a look at the link for Social-Hire's Founder Tony Restell. You will see that other Twitter users have determined that Tony is an authority on subjects like social media, job search and recruitment - and so have included him on their lists. Now imagine you've found the first recruiters whose twitter accounts you've decided to follow in your niche sector. Imagine your delight when you see that those recruiters feature on lists of other twitter accounts in the same field. Twitter lists can hold up to 500 twitter accounts. So this approach can very quickly see you following loads of twitter accounts highly relevant to your job search.


--- Search For Recruiters Now ---

Search by specialism (eg. strategy recruiter, sales recruiter) and / or by geography and / or by name of employer. 

Not registered yet? If you see someone you'd like to contact, simply register as a candidate (or register as a recruiter). Registering takes just seconds and allows you to contact members of the community discreetly and for free.
 

Cleansing Twitter Accounts From Your Following List


- Find out how to cleanse your twitter account and the complete article

Tuesday, November 19, 2013

6 Ways to Attract Recruiters to Your LinkedIn Profile

Stacey Politi

You know the drill. You’re unhappy in your current job — or unhappy with no job — and are desperately updating your LinkedIn profile that hasn’t been touched since the last time you were in this situation.

Well, you’re not alone; this sums up the dysfunctional relationship many professionals have with their LinkedIn profiles. While some flock to LinkedIn only when in need and apply to already posted positions, the platform is at its best when maintained regularly and optimized to allow hiring managers to reach out to you.

LinkedIn's career expert Nicole Williams helps elaborate on six ways to optimize your profile and attract more recruiters to you now.

1. Develop a Keyword Strategy

If search engine optimization is not your expertise, here is a mini lesson. LinkedIn’s search functionality makes it easy to find people by their name, skills and any other words that appear in their profile — which is why these words should be chosen with thought.

First, make a list of terms associated with your skills and experience. Ask yourself, "What words would someone search for to find me?" If strapped for terms, seek inspiration from a job positing you are interested in.

Next, take those terms and rework them from the perspective of a searching recruiter. For example, you may have the term "digital strategy" in your LinkedIn profile; however, a recruiter would be more likely to search for the term "digital strategist." Synonyms are also important; you never know if recruiters will search for "digital," "online" or "Internet," so include them all. Lastly, you want to organically incorporate these key terms into your profile to attract both the search engine and human reader alike.

2. Say Cheese

Williams says that "hiring managers are seven times more likely to view your profile if you have a photo; it’s a must have."

Not only does a photo allow your profile to stand out in the search results, but also shows recruiters that you are active on the network and LinkedIn is a viable way to contact you. Williams suggests using a photo that places you in the context of your job. You want to help hiring managers envision you in that position.

"If you are a chef, feel free to show yourself in a kitchen, or in front of a whiteboard if you are a marketer," Williams says. "But don’t use a picture of yourself with your dog, unless you’re a veterinarian."

3. Be Vain

Williams also prompts all passive and active job seekers to claim their vanity URL. This is a customized URL that drives directly to your profile.

"Using your name in your vanity URL gives it a chance to appear in a Google when someone searches for you," says Williams.

This makes it easier for hiring managers to find you and share your information with other hiring managers. If your preferred vanity URL is already claimed, incorporate a relevant key term, for example www.linkedin.com/in/CarlySimonSinger.

Ways 4-6 and the complete Mashable article

8 Quick & Easy Resume Tips You Can Use Now

by Shannon Smedstad

A friend of mine once said, “Everyone should know a good lawyer, accountant and resume writer.” And, amidst my group, I have been anointed the go-to person for all things resumes … which I love. When a dear friend’s husband was recently laid off, she quickly emailed me with a request to review it.

For those of us in the recruiting or career services industry, we keep up on all the resume dos and don’ts. But for typical job seekers — know matter how much information is posted online, how smart they are or what industry they are in — they are probably going to need some level of help improving their resumes.

8 QUICK AND EASY TIPS TO IMPROVE YOUR RESUME

1. Fix typos: When you are staring at your resume, hour after hour, often you start to glance over words and can miss a typo or two. Be sure to double and triple check each heading, sentence and word.

2. Retitle your resume: As an HR pro, I like seeing someone who has saved his or her resume with context. Instead of simply Jennifer Resume.doc, try something like Jennifer Smith PR Executive.doc.

3. Save a PDF version: A PDF version can help eliminate formatting issues that may occur when emailing your resume to someone using a different operating system. And, to me, the PDF just seems a bit more professional.


4. Add your LinkedIn profile: In today’s online world, having a digital presence is important. LinkedIn profiles — that are well written and include recommendations — can help enhance your flat, “paper” resume.
Tips 5-10 and the complete article

Monday, November 18, 2013

Six Reasons You’ve Failed the Interview Before It’s Even Over

Landing the interview for that dream job can be an exhilarating ride for anyone seeking a change in their career. The dizzy excitement of that chance of being so close can make anyone desperate to do well. However there are many cases in which those who really want to succeed have not, generally because of mistakes made before the interview has even finished.

It is common knowledge that an interviewee should give precise examples of previous work in relation to questions, maintain regular eye contact with their interviewer and arrive on time. However, there are other potential mistakes that you may not realise, which can be avoided.

“When a candidate comes in for an interview they are being assessed on everything, from posture to their industry knowledge.  When we interview a candidate, we have to take into account how our clients will perceive this person. At this stage of the process we are able to advise and help as much as possible, especially in areas they were previously unaware of, to give the candidate every chance of producing a good interview.” - Jenny Pape, Director at Workfish Recruitment

So what are those mistakes and what can you do to avoid them?


1) Preparation:

The most important aspect of the interview is the preparation that the candidate undertakes. Applicants can make their life a lot easier by making sure that they are well prepared before they even leave for the interview. For instance, those who are dedicated in their search for a new job can often have several interviews lined up at any one time. If those who are in this situation get confused or mix up interview dates, it can demonstrate poor organisational skills and can obviously be detrimental to interview success.

Another issue with preparation is interviewees looking like they have not had enough of a good sleep the night before. This can often be the case if they are anxious or worried about the interview – which is natural – after all an interview is a stressful time. However if the person turns up with rings around their eyes or starts to yawn in front of the interviewer, it can be pretty damaging.

2) Not impressing with your dressing:

It is amazing how many applicants really do not consider what they are wearing to an interview. There are those who really do turn up to an interview in just jeans and a t-shirt. This does not look professional to the interviewer and can seem like the interviewee has no real intention of pursuing the job. No matter how ‘cool’ or trendy the organisation is, it is always better to be overdressed than underdressed.It is not just dressing in the right clothes that can make the difference. Having the clothes freshly cleaned and professionally ironed is a huge benefit. Wearing a creased shirt or trousers shows poor organisation and a lack of personal care.

3) Arrival in the lobby:

How a candidate arrives in the lobby, or at the reception of the interviewing company, is just as important as how they introduce themselves to the interviewer. It is often forgotten that the receptionist is often asked what they noticed about the candidates. Turning up while using the mobile phone, chewing gum or wearing sunglasses – will be noticed, even if they are disposed off before the interviewer shows their presence.

Once the candidate has arrived in the lobby of the company – the best option will be to politely introduce themselves to the receptionist. It is best not to look at your phone but to instead sit and read either the notes on the company so they are fresh in your mind or any literature on the organisation that is present in the lobby.

It would be important to note at this time that being late is also frowned upon. However there are times when being late is not your fault. During these moments it is best to ring in advance to apologise, explain the reason succinctly without being negative.

Author: Josh Hansen writes on all manner of topics but can usually be found wittering on about the world of employment and technology, or both.

How to Conquer Your Job Search on LinkedIn in 15 Minutes a Day

Welcome to the busiest season of the year: schedules are filled with holiday shopping, end-of-year planning, get-togethers, winter weather prep, and so much more. It can be difficult to keep on top of your job search when the rest of life is so busy. My best advice is to create a simple, consistent job search schedule and stick to it. To get you started, here’s a sample schedule to help you master LinkedIn in just 15 minutes per day.

Monday
Start your week with a five-minute scan of the feed on your LinkedIn homepage. Your network may be sharing interesting articles and you may come across valuable insights from your chosen LinkedIn Today channels or the Influencers you follow. If you see an article that interests you, quickly skim it and click “like” to acknowledge the person who posted it.

Spend the next 10 minutes searching for jobs that are posted on LinkedIn. A recent study by Bright.com reported that Monday is the best day to look for a job, so don’t procrastinate! Many jobs allow you to apply using your LinkedIn profile, so you can quickly submit your application. If you’re a Job Seeker Premium subscriber, don’t forget to click “feature my application” so you can appear at the top of the list of job applicants for jobs where applications are collected on LinkedIn.

Tuesday
Scroll through your feed again for the first five minutes. This time, comment on the status updates of a few of your connections. Even a simple “Congratulations!” on a job change can nurture your relationships and help you stay top of mind, which may prompt others to review your profile and even recommend an opportunity they hear about.

Spend the next five minutes visiting your favorite LinkedIn Groups. Post some thoughts on a Featured Discussion or do a search on your area of interest and comment on a discussion related to that topic. To get the biggest return on your time investment, you can post a discussion yourself. Asking a simple, professionally relevant question generally attracts the most comments, such as “What is your favorite all-time marketing book?” or “What tech trends are you predicting for 2014?”

Take the last five minutes of your Tuesday to make sure your LinkedIn Inbox is clear. Respond to messages and connection requests to show people who reach out to you that you are eager to build and nurture your professional relationships.

Thursday, November 7, 2013

4 secrets to standing out on LinkedIn

By Samantha Collier

What separates the great LinkedIn profiles from the average ones is how people use all of the various features on LinkedIn. Of course, it’s also important to have a fully optimized profile.

But it’s not good enough to just fill out your profile anymore. You must do that pesky act we all talk about so often—engage.

The LinkedIn blog recently published an article about four ways to stand out on LinkedIn. Here’s the distilled version:

1. Status updates

LinkedIn users who share content with their LinkedIn networks at least once per week are nearly 10 times more likely to be contacted by a recruiter for new opportunities. News feeds are prominently displayed on home pages due to the recent LinkedIn upgrades. Take advantage of this by sharing articles, blog posts, third-party content, newsletters, etc. Remember, quality is key. And don’t over post either.

2. Schedule, schedule, schedule

Many professionals (including the attorneys with whom I work) don’t think they have the time to be active on LinkedIn. Because LinkedIn has a variety of smartphone and iPad apps, this can’t be your excuse anymore.

Create a schedule and stick to it. Remember, you have to repeat a new action a hundred times to create a new habit. Post updates to LinkedIn on the train to work in the morning, or when you have your morning coffee. When you do it is up to you but you need to stick with it.


Secrets 3,4, and the complete article

How The Informational Interview Helps You Get The Job

By

Anthony Moore has the things that old folks in old movies like ambitious young whippersnappers to have: moxie, pluck, spunk, and the like. He's a new college grad with, appropriately enough, a site for new college grads, and while he is yet to land his yearned-for dream job in "content writing," he is hustling up connections--the kind that, we know, land gigs.

How so? From a hard-earned nepotism begotten from attending an elite university? From being born into immense social standing? By creating a ridiculously great "I quit" YouTube hit? No: our Mr. Moore, as a good millennial does, engineers his own nepotism.

The secret: the informational interview.

Let's allow him to tell us what that means:
An informational interview is a meeting between two people, one who’s a professional working in a certain field or industry and one who’s looking to learn more about that industry and get their foot in the door.
Let's go over why informational interviews are awesome.

Surprisingly, informational interviews yield awesome information (and contacts)


When we talked to Bob Pozen last year, the former financial heavyweight, current Harvard Business School lecturer, and recent author of Extreme Productivity said that when you're on the job hunt (or planning for your career in general), the best way to get to know if you want to work in a field (without the full-on commitment of starting a job) is to simply talk to the people who do it.

Learn the parts that rock, the parts that suck, and the parts that are surprising. People love to read "what I wish I would have known when I was 22" blog posts; informational interviews allow you to pull that refracted reflectiveness out of the professionals that you have a job-crush on.

Additionally, you can ask these successful folks what skills they wish they had right now: like, say, a fluency in data or programming or visualization. Then we can look for gigs that let us grow those skill sets or not give a damn and and learn in-demand skills on our own time.

But the knowledge ain't the only thing. Because if the interview goes well, as Moore says, you'll now know somebody in the industry. Somebody that likes you, which is the way people land jobs.

Informational interviews let you get to know each other

As Northwestern management professor Lauren Rivera will tell you, hiring is much more like dating than a hiring manager might like to admit.

Folks tend to hire people who remind them of themselves, the people who they wouldn't mind being stuck with in an airport with, the people who they "click" with. The thing is, though, when we say we "click" with someone, that's a way of saying that you have same interests, background, and goals.

Additionally, when you do the interview you can get to know the personality (or psychographic, if you want to get pedantic) of the folks in organization or industry in question. Why is this important? The informational interview, then, is a way of ferreting out that "click" with a hiring manager. In a lightly Machiavellian sense, you could better learn to tailor your self-presentation to the hiring person's own self-perception.

Ok, so how do you do them?  Find out HOW and read the complete Fast Company article

Wednesday, November 6, 2013

4 Reasons You Might Not Get Recommendations On LinkedIn



It was easy to get recommendations when you were six. All you really needed was a pocketful of Jolly Ranchers (especially the watermelon kind). Kids you didn’t know were suddenly your friends. They told other kids about you and suddenly they were your friends, too. It was all fun and games until it got hot outside and the Jolly Ranchers got melty and sticky.

Now you’re a grownup, and a pocket full of Jolly Ranchers won’t do you much good, especially if you’re looking for a job. And the problem isn’t just that you can’t send Jolly Ranchers through the Internet. No, it’s more complicated than that.

Have you ever asked a LinkedIn Connection for a Recommendation and heard… nothing? They days turn into weeks, and you know darn well they’re active on LinkedIn because you see them in your feed? Frustrating, isn’t it? And confusing.

There’s any number of reasons, good and not-so-good, why your Connection may not have responded to your Recommendation request. Here are some reasons you might not get recommendations on LinkedIn:

1. He may not know how to respond to your Recommendation request.
It’s within the realm of possibility that your Connection is a bit of a luddite. Maybe he can do basic things LinkedIn – perhaps a friend helped him set up his profile. But when he got your Recommendation request, he didn’t know what to do. If you are certain this Recommendation is worth the time and effort for both of you, offer a lesson – screen shots via e-mail, possibly, or a visit to his office.

2. She honestly may have forgotten.
Maybe she is in the middle of a big project at work, or maybe she’s overwhelmed for other reasons. If you have every reason to believe this person would give you a good recommendation, it’s okay to send a reminder message or e-mail, “Hey, did you forget…?” You can also send your request again.
  • Go to your Settings and enter your password.
  • Click “Manage your recommendations.”
  • Find the position you’ve requested the recommendation for and click “Manage.”
  • Find the person you want to remind and click on “Resend” next to her name.
  • Edit the message and hit send. I put in an extra “Just a polite reminder :-)” at the top.

5 Benefits of Finding Work Through a Temp Agency

Posted by Jeff Kells

Some people still have an outdated view of a temp job. They think that a temp job is something you take to make ends meet while you’re looking for a “real” job. That kind of thinking ignores the many benefits that a temp job can offer. If you’re considering a temp job, but can’t quite shake that old-fashioned viewpoint, here are some benefits of a temp job that may change your mind.

1. Take Charge of Your Time

Everyone has different demands put on their time. You may be a student, have family obligations, or just need some personal time before starting a long-term career. A temp job gives you the flexibility to work full- or part-time, without making any long-term commitments to an employer. Since you get to choose which assignments you take, you decide how much of your time is devoted to working, and how much is free for other obligations.

2. Keep Your Skills Sharp

Whether you’re taking time off for personal reasons, or having trouble finding the perfect job, blank periods on a resume look bad. A temp job lets you continue developing job skills and building your resume, all on your terms. When you do decide that the time is right to continue pursuing a long-term career, you won’t have blank spots on your resume holding you back.

3. Expand Your Network


Working a temp job gives you access to a huge number of professional contacts. Everyone from recruiters to employers can potentially help you advance your career. Even your coworkers and fellow temps can prove to be valuable resources. Just one or two temp jobs could provide you with the kind of contact list that other professionals spend decades putting together.

Benefits 4,5, and the complete article