Thursday, April 28, 2011

5 Personal Branding Tips To Boost Your Job Search

By: Adriana Llames



Do you know that what you have, or don’t have, in your pocket can affect the outcome of your job search?
Experience. Education. Skills. We all know that these factors matter when you’re on the hunt for a new job, but how can the contents of your pocket make a difference? These 5 Personal Branding will tell you just that, and more.


1. It’s All In Your Head
“The Secret” by Rhonda Byrne is based upon the law of attraction; thoughts become things. While I won’t say that you can sit at home all day thinking about a new job and it will simply manifest itself, I will say that thinking positive works. Taking it a step further to look positive on the outside is important as well.
According to Harvard and Wesleyan economists, attractive people get hired and promoted more readily and earn more money because they’re seen as more self-confident.

2. Practice Makes Perfect
Ask any pro sports athlete and they’ll tell you that practice is essential to winning the game. If you want to win the job search game, practice your personal branding pitch. Step 1: Create the pitch. Step 2: Practice the pitch. Step 3: Deliver an authentic, natural pitch.
Delivering a practiced pitch without your personality and authentic, individual stories is like showing up on the beach in August with a spray tan. You can do it but why would you?

3. Pocket Power
“Let’s connect next week. Do you have a card?” Job seeker home run! Fireworks are going off in your head until you realize you don’t have business cards. What do you do now? Play it cool? Ask for their card? Sure, you can do that. Or, you can be a powerfully branded professional and hand them a personal branded business card, land an appointment for next week and enjoy the firework display going on in your head. Check out www.vistaprint.com for easy-to-make cards.

Tips 4 - 5 and Complete Personal Brand Blog Article

What's In A Name? A Lot, Says LinkedIn

Names tell stories: LinkedIn locates divides by gender, nationality, and profession.

If I had my sights on the corner office, I'd do well to re-brand myself as "Bill." According to LinkedIn, that is. After scouring its repository of 100 million professionals, LinkedIn has released some fascinating data about first names and career paths, not to mention some delightful infographics.

Thanks to its global reach, LinkedIn has data on professionals from across the planet. Senior Research Scientist Monica Rogati started by combing the database for names over-indexed (over-represented) among CEOs. The results revealed a gender divide.
LinkedIn CEO Names The top five CEO names for men were either short or shortened versions of popular first names: Peter, Bob, Jack, Bruce, and Fred. The top five names for women executives, meanwhile, tended to use full names: Deborah, Sally, Debra, Cynthia, and Carolyn. Of the contrast, Rogati cites Onomastics specialist Dr. Frank Nuessel, who posits that males use shortened names to "denote a sense of friendliness and openness," whereas females employ full names to "project a more professional image."

While monosyllabic names are over-represented amongst American executives, globally it's another story. The Brazilians have Roberto, Spaniards Xavier, Germans Wolfgang, and the Italians—I'm not making this up—Guido. And that's before season 4.


What's In A Name? A Lot, Says LinkedIn

By William Fenton
Names tell stories: LinkedIn locates divides by gender, nationality, and profession.


If I had my sights on the corner office, I'd do well to re-brand myself as "Bill." According to LinkedIn, that is. After scouring its repository of 100 million professionals, LinkedIn has released some fascinating data about first names and career paths, not to mention some delightful infographics.

Thanks to its global reach, LinkedIn has data on professionals from across the planet. Senior Research Scientist Monica Rogati started by combing the database for names over-indexed (over-represented) among CEOs. The results revealed a gender divide.
LinkedIn CEO Names The top five CEO names for men were either short or shortened versions of popular first names: Peter, Bob, Jack, Bruce, and Fred. The top five names for women executives, meanwhile, tended to use full names: Deborah, Sally, Debra, Cynthia, and Carolyn. Of the contrast, Rogati cites Onomastics specialist Dr. Frank Nuessel, who posits that males use shortened names to "denote a sense of friendliness and openness," whereas females employ full names to "project a more professional image."

While monosyllabic names are over-represented amongst American executives, globally it's another story. The Brazilians have Roberto, Spaniards Xavier, Germans Wolfgang, and the Italians—I'm not making this up—Guido. And that's before season 4.

More Info On Name And Complete Article

Wednesday, April 27, 2011

Hiring Managers Share Their Secrets

By Amy Dziobek
For many, technology plays a pivotal role in how we search for a job. Thanks to online resources, applying for a dream position is as easy as a click of a mouse. But in a competitive market, how do you make sure your resume gets in the right hands?

Robert Crowder, head of talent acquisitions at Aetna in Hartford says he sees more than 430 applications come in each day. He warns job seekers, however, about becoming a ‘resume spammer.’

“Technology has probably made it easier for more people to apply to a job, so, that’s where we get that phenomenon of resume spammers. It is so much easier to apply to a larger volume of things,” said Crowder.

So how do you choose where to send your application? Crowder says although career sites are great, it is best to go right to the source.

“We use CareerBuilder at times, but primarily it ends up being our own site,” Crowder said.
If you want your resume to stand out, Crowder says make sure it matches the position for which you are applying.

“Use those keywords that are in the job description that are relevant to your background and that will help you rise up in somebody taking a look at your background,” said Crowder.

If it is skilled work you are looking for, however, Rina Fochi, human resources manager for Stew Leonards said, your background is not everything.

“Be open to learning new things and doing different things that you might not have done before, because to be more flexible allows the employer to be more flexible,” said Fochi.

According to Fochi, with 36 percent of the store’s team members having been referred by employees who already worked there, networking is key.

The Hunt - A Graduating College Student's Search For A Job

Dan Treadway

I opened my inbox to find yet another email with a generic yet familiar subject line. Its content was predictable:
"Reaching the final stage of interviews is an accomplishment, and as we mentioned, competition is extremely high for a very limited number of positions. While we were very impressed with your qualifications, regretfully, you will not be continuing on in the process."

As far as form letter job rejection emails go, it was surprisingly thorough, containing three whole paragraphs. A separate rejection email I had received a couple of weeks prior was only a couple of sentences long. I can't recall the copy of the email exactly, but in my mind it read, "You didn't get the job. Sucks."

I had made up my mind in September of my senior year that I would try to find a job after I graduated in the hopes of gaining some real world experience before eventually going to graduate school.

Naturally, I understood the economy wasn't begging for another wide-eyed communications major to be unleashed upon it, but I had a fleeting sense of optimism that I'd be a compelling candidate for something at least. I felt like I had done most things right throughout college: I maintained a high GPA, got solid internship experience, and somehow I had managed to never get arrested.

At first my optimism seemed warranted. I got a response from the first large company I applied to and subsequently was in contact with them until January. Following five interviews, I assumed that I was a shoe-in for the position. After all, I had answered and re-answered questions regarding just about everything except my dental history. But alas, one fateful Friday my phone rang and I was given a classic, "We really like you and think you're going to be successful, but we just don't think this was the right fit." Not the right fit after five interviews? That's one complicated puzzle.

I decided to change up my strategy and, in addition to applying to jobs, I attended the glorified meat market known as a career fair on my campus. While I was there I met a woman who thought I was a good candidate for the media organization she represented and I was encouraged to apply for a paid internship there. I kept in touch with her as I applied, and was eventually contacted by the organization and told that several shows were interested in me and that they would call me individually for interviews in the coming weeks. I sat by my phone, and, as phones have a tendency to do whenever one sits by them, it never rang.

From there I continued my search and somehow was selected as a finalist to drive the Oscar Mayer Weinermobile around the country. It started as mostly a joke when I first applied on my colleges career services website, and within a month it became a realistic possibility as I was flown out to Wisconsin to interview with 29 other candidates, of which 12 would be selected. The interview was fun, and everyone at the company was nice, but alas three weeks later I learned that I did not cut the mustard. I was Oscar Mayer humbled.

Now, eight months, dozens of applications, and six final interviews with various companies that resulted in generic rejection phone calls/emails later, I've begun relating to excerpts from the Upton Sinclair novel The Jungle, of all things.

"They were beaten; they had lost the game, they were swept aside. It was not less tragic because it was so sordid, because that it had to do with wages and grocery bills and rents."

Read The Rest Of Dan's Story @ HuffingtonPost

Tuesday, April 26, 2011

LinkedIn: #1 Place for Job Searchers Online

By Marilyn Maslin @ Resume Footprint

According to the 2010 Global Brainstorming Day LinkedIn is now the #1 online networking platform for active and passive job searchers.  Career coaches, resume writers, and outplacement specialists all agree that if you are looking to impress, be found, and get results online, you need a well-branded LinkedIn profile.

Today’s hiring managers use LinkedIn to source and research candidates.  Devote time to establishing a quality, branded LinkedIn profile that will attract recruiters and job opportunities.  Job searchers, who don’t take time to write a strategic, keyword rich LinkedIn profile, may be overlooked by recruiters.

About LinkedIn
LinkedIn is the largest professional network online, hitting a milestonein May 2011, with over 100 million members in over 200 countries and territories.   About one million new members join LinkedIn every week.  Originally created as a place to build an online resume, today it is primarily used for professional networking. 

Users create profiles promoting their work history or online resumes.  LinkedIn profiles include career history, education, connections and professional recommendations.  Additionally you can join groups for networking purposes.

How to Find a Job Using LinkedIn

Build Your Personal Brand:  Use your LinkedIn profile to manage your professional brand or career footprint.  This self-packaging is all about differentiation you in the job marketplace.  You want to leave an indelible impression on your contacts and the community that is uniquely distinguishable.  

Profile Perfect:  Your LinkedIn profile must match your resume and needs to be complete and flawless.  No spelling or typographical errors.  This is your resume online and it will be critiqued by recruiters, hiring managers and HR staff.

Professional Photo:  Get an updated, professional headshot made and communicate to your prospective employer who you are through your energy, warmth and approachability.  If you don’t have a professional portrait, post a flattering, professional picture of yourself.

Headline:  Your headline will automatically display as the last job you held unless you change it.  Consider making your headline your professional brand, or the job you are targeting.  Brand yourself for the job you want – for your future.

LinkedIn: #1 Place for Job Searchers Online

By Marilyn Maslin @ Resume Footprint

According to the 2010 Global Brainstorming Day LinkedIn is now the #1 online networking platform for active and passive job searchers.  Career coaches, resume writers, and outplacement specialists all agree that if you are looking to impress, be found, and get results online, you need a well-branded LinkedIn profile.

Today’s hiring managers use LinkedIn to source and research candidates.  Devote time to establishing a quality, branded LinkedIn profile that will attract recruiters and job opportunities.  Job searchers, who don’t take time to write a strategic, keyword rich LinkedIn profile, may be overlooked by recruiters.

About LinkedIn
LinkedIn is the largest professional network online, hitting a milestonein May 2011, with over 100 million members in over 200 countries and territories.   About one million new members join LinkedIn every week.  Originally created as a place to build an online resume, today it is primarily used for professional networking.

Users create profiles promoting their work history or online resumes.  LinkedIn profiles include career history, education, connections and professional recommendations.  Additionally you can join groups for networking purposes.

How to Find a Job Using LinkedIn


Build Your Personal Brand:  Use your LinkedIn profile to manage your professional brand or career footprint.  This self-packaging is all about differentiation you in the job marketplace.  You want to leave an indelible impression on your contacts and the community that is uniquely distinguishable.

Profile Perfect:  Your LinkedIn profile must match your resume and needs to be complete and flawless.  No spelling or typographical errors.  This is your resume online and it will be critiqued by recruiters, hiring managers and HR staff.

Professional Photo:  Get an updated, professional headshot made and communicate to your prospective employer who you are through your energy, warmth and approachability.  If you don’t have a professional portrait, post a flattering, professional picture of yourself.

Headline:  Your headline will automatically display as the last job you held unless you change it.  Consider making your headline your professional brand, or the job you are targeting.  Brand yourself for the job you want – for your future.

Monday, April 25, 2011

Five Steps to Building Your Network

by Douglas R. Conant


One morning in the 1980s, I went to the office as usual and was told that my job was being eliminated. I packed up my personal effects and left the building by lunchtime.

I was, of course, in shock. For 10 years, my whole world had consisted of my work with this company and my young, growing family. Now half of that world had disappeared. I was angry and bitter and I felt remarkably alone.

Fortunately, the company set me up with an outplacement counselor who gave me very good advice about building a network — advice that I follow to this day. I not only found a new great job that helped me get my career on track, but I built relationships with hundreds of friends and advisors who have stood me in good stead for decades.

Here's my step-by-step guide to building your own successful network.

Step #1: Identify your network cluster. First, figure out where you want to focus your efforts. Do you want to work for a large corporation, a medium-sized company, or a startup? Are you interested in marketing, sales, manufacturing, IT or any other specific function? What are your geography limitations? Then, create a list of contacts within those parameters — not just executives within a chosen company, but also executive search specialists, consultants, and anyone else who can help within your areas of interest and expertise.

Step #2: Ask for ideas and advice. Contact each person on your list and say, "I was recommended to you by [so-and-so]. I'm hoping to get your ideas and advice for my job search, and would appreciate 15 minutes of your time." During your interview, give them your brief elevator pitch outlining your background and skills, and then ask for their ideas and advice. Remember, this meeting is not about asking for a job. It's about being very sensitive to your interviewee's time, and listening carefully to what they have to say. As the meeting wraps up, ask for names of a couple of people they recommend you talk to. With each interview, you will gain two more leads. Within a few months, you will develop a large number of leads in your areas of interest.

Step #3: Follow up immediately with personal, handwritten thank-you notes to everyone you encountered during the meeting — not just your interviewee, but also to the executive assistant and even the person at the front desk — and mail it the day after your interview. Doing so signals that you are a quality person, that you care, and that you are on top of your game. This is an opportunity for you to establish a distinctive job search — make the most of it.

Steps 4 - 5 and Complete Harvard Business Review Article


Douglas R. Conant is President and CEO of the Campbell Soup Company headquartered in Camden, New Jersey. He is the co-author, with Mette Norgaard, of Touchpoints: Creating Powerful Leadership Connections in the Smallest of Moments (Jossey-Bass, May 2011).

Resources for Job-Hunting Seniors

The tough employment market of the past few years has been particularly hard on people age 55-plus. But older job seekers don't have to go it alone. A number of online tools -- as well as in-person training centers scattered across the country -- can provide support.


The hurdles that older adults face in finding work today are considerable. They include basic age discrimination, as well as rapid changes in information technology. The latter, in particular, have transformed not just the workplace, but the job search itself, leaving many older adults at a disadvantage.



Statistics show the need for a leveling of a playing field that's tilted against older workers. In 2010, among those aged 50 and over and out of work, more than 53% were unemployed for more than six months, according to government data analyzed by Richard Johnson, a senior fellow at the Urban Institute. In contrast, 46% of jobless men ages 25 to 49 were out of work for more than six months.


Older workers "really have a hard time becoming re-employed," Mr. Johnson says.


To help older workers, the Department of Labor in 2009 awarded $10 million in grants to organizations in Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Texas, Vermont, Washington state and Wisconsin. This new program, called the Aging Worker Initiative, is aimed at helping anyone 55 and older who is unemployed or underemployed -- earning, say, close to the minimum wage. (The list of program managers can be found by searching dol.gov for the Aging Workers Initiative.)


This effort is in addition to the long-standing Senior Community Service Employment Program. SCSEP offers a job-training program for those in low-income families and the unemployed.


The Aging Worker Initiative programs generally start with the basics, such as training older workers to be more tech-savvy. That includes showing them where to look for jobs online. One prominent example: careeronestop.org, the Department of Labor-sponsored website offering thousands of job listings nationwide.


More Advice and Complete WSJ Article

Friday, April 22, 2011

'Are You There God? It's Me, Jobless'

Shira Hirschman Weiss

Last Thursday, the Labor Department released data stating that the number of new unemployment applications is at its lowest since July 2008. While this indicates the economy is picking up speed, the news can either be a beacon of hope or salt rubbed into wounds for the presently unemployed. Faith is in a precarious perch for the religious and jobless. While some become despondent from repeated rejection and thwarted efforts, others cling to faith and turn fervently to prayer.

Deirdre McEachern is a career coach who says she sees clients "whose faith has been enhanced and re-affirmed by the job hunt." One of those clients, Jennifer Bindhammer, was a flight attendant with United in September 2011. "She came to me in early 2002 re-evaluating her life," explains McEachern. "We worked together for several months and in the process she reconnected strongly with her personal faith. Once she deciphered her life purpose, she felt as if God was opening doors for her -- helpful coincidences kept appearing -- like the sign she spotted on a subway platform advertising an MBA program." This literal and figurative 'sign' led the flight attendant to pursue her MBA.

In the process of contemplating the switch to a corporate profession, Bindhammer -- no stranger to the friendly skies -- turned to the heavens. "I enjoyed flying and I enjoyed my job, she writes in a testimonial, "It just wasn't the challenge that I wanted it to be, and realized that I needed to be challenged. When I thought about changing careers, I prayed about it -- I actively prayed."
Bindhammer followed her passion, received her MBA and kept praying. She is now working with an international air transport consultancy that focuses on aviation. 

While the former flight attendant's faith was reaffirmed, Fiona (not her real name) reflects on how she sunk into a deep depression when she was laid off from a Public Relations start-up during the late 90s "dot bomb" era. She stopped praying and began spending Friday nights at local bars instead of the synagogue. She could have benefitted from an organization like Project Ezrah, had it been around at the time. The North Jersey based organization was founded in 2001 to aid members of the Jewish community (and now helps Jews and non-Jews alike) who were suffering from the hardships of unemployment.

Rabbi Yossie Stern, Executive Director of Project Ezrah, has seen individuals like Fiona who have been turned off to the synagogue experience, who are angry with God, and who are depressed about their situation to the point of losing faith. His organization has put together programs to help those who feel despondent. Notably, it developed initiatives to professionally retrain unemployed baby boomers.

"When your brother is impoverished, you have to be able to empower him to be self sufficient," he explains, "The highest form of charity is being able to afford someone a job, to help him achieve the same sense of self-esteem and quality of life that you have." His organization provides a wide range of services including a popular job board, career counseling services, financial counseling, mental health counseling, job training, and "in the box and out of the box services. We try to provide it all," Stern says. There is also a LinkedIn group that includes seminars on how to use social networking to find a career and much more. "We empower people to network, which is the best way to find employment." 

Fiona eventually found her way back to a public relations career and to the synagogue, but admits that she felt at odds with her faith when things were uncertain: "I didn't feel it was God's fault," she explains, "It was related to a sudden, dark depression, which came about from my unemployment." And which, she admits, also may have been related to the fact that she was in a bad relationship at the time. "When life is unstable, it contributes to the instability of unemployment." Rabbi Stern stresses that it is critical that spouses be encouraging and not place blame due to unemployment. He emphasizes that a support system and building of confidence is essential to one's job hunt.

While Fiona received counseling for her depression, she realized she needed to make significant efforts to find a new job. "The Hebrew word Hishtadlut kept flashing through my head," she says. Hishtadlut means that one must make their own efforts. It relates to the universal concept of "God only helps those who help themselves."

Read the rest of the Huffington Post article

Jim Stroud demos Linkedin Signal and how to use it to find job leads.

This episode marks the end of season 1 of The Jim Stroud Show. Subscribe now to get updates on the next season. (Scroll down for more jobhunting resources.)


More Jim Stroud Advice @ 
the Recruiters Lounge

11 Reasons Why Every College Student Needs a LinkedIn Page

by K. Walsh



While in college, students worry about having enough money for tuition, what to major in, finding time to study, and passing mid-terms and finals. Having a LinkedIn page is probably far from their mind. But it shouldn’t be! LinkedIn is a valuable tool in their arsenal for helping them to establish their career.

It is important to remember that LinkedIn is your professional face to the business world. It is not like Facebook or YouTube. Don’t post goofy pictures, be silly, or say inappropriate things. Put your best foot forward. You are creating your own personal branding and this is your sales letter (about you) to future employers and to the world.
With that in mind, here are 11 reasons why every student needs to join LinkenIn:
  1. Build your professional network. It’s never too early to start building a network with people in your career area. Start by linking to classmates who are in your major. While they are friends and classmates now, in the future they become business referrals. Ask professors who are in LinkedIn to write a recommendation for you. Linking to professors ensure that you will stay connected to them after you graduate. This could be beneficial.
  2. Check out career paths. Find people who are in LinkedIn who are already employed in your desired profession. Check out their profiles to see what they have done to become successful. See if you can incorporate something from their career path into yours.
  3. Prepare for interviews. When you have a job or internship interview, review the profile of the person who will interview you. Having this background knowledge during the interview will help impress the interviewer.
  4. Get referrals. Networking is all about who you know and who those people know. If there is someone in LinkedIn that you would like to meet, ask a mutual acquaintance to for an introduction.
  5. Land internships or jobs while in school. Is there a company that you would like to work for or an internship that interests you? LinkedIn can help you find a common connection to someone at that place of business.
  6. Gain connections from conference attendees. When you meet new acquaintances at a conference that you attend as a student, chances are you do not have a business card to share. Nor do other students. LinkedIn is the perfect place to maintain a connection to those people once you have returned back to school.

Top 10 Tips For Building A Strong LinkedIn Profile

Author Jay Markunas

Top ten tips for building a strong profile from LinkedIn:


1.  Don’t cut-and-paste your resume. You wouldn’t hand out your resume before introducing yourself.  Describe your experience and abilities as you would to someone you just met.


2.  Borrow from the best marketers. Use specific adjectives, colorful verbs, active construction (ie..”managed project team” instead of “responsible for project team”).


3.  Write a personal tagline. It’s the first thing people see in your profile.  It follows your name in search hit lists.


4.  Put your elevator pitch to work. The more meaningful your summary is, the more time visitors will spend on your profile.


5.  Point out your skills. The Specialties field is your personal search engine optimizer when Recruiters are looking for candidates.

Tips 6 - 10 + Graphic + Complete Article

When Using Job Boards, It Pays to Go Niche

By Alexis Grant


Why industry-specific sites are more useful than larger job boards

While job seekers should never rely entirely on job boards, here's a tip for when you do browse listings: Use niche sites.

Too often, job seekers turn to large, well-known job boards like Monster, Indeed, CareerBuilder.com, or SimplyHired. But tapping into niche sites, which offer listings for a specific industry or location, increases your chances not only of finding the job you're looking for, but also of landing that job, experts say.

Click here to find out more!
Why? Because contrary to popular belief, large job boards don't aggregate all listings. Smaller, more targeted sites usually include openings that don't show up elsewhere. They also sometimes offer contact information for the hiring manager rather than routing you to a generic application, which means your resume is less likely to disappear into a black hole. And while applicants from niche sites tend to be more qualified—because their skill set more often matches what the employer is looking for—you'll compete with fewer candidates there than you would on well-known sites.

"You're a bigger fish in a smaller pond," says Chris Russell, a job board consultant and CEO of AllCountyJobs.com. "You have more chance of standing out on a niche job board than you do on a Monster."


Smaller companies in particular often prefer using niche boards to find applicants because they tend to get responses from higher quality candidates, Russell says, which means they have to sift through fewer applications to find the right hire. If a manager is looking for a sales employee, for example, she knows she's reaching out to the right audience when she posts on Sales Gravy, a networking community for sales professionals that includes a job board. Universities that want to hire faculty often post on HigherEdJobs. And companies that need to fill programming or other tech-heavy positions are smart to turn to CrunchBoard, a job board on TechCrunch, a website that focuses on technology
and Internet news.

Indeed, for every industry, there's a niche job board—or two or three or more. But how to find them? Niche boards aren't as in your face as the massive job websites, so you have to know to go fishing for one that's relevant for your skills. To start, talk to your co-workers or other people who work in your industry about where they look for jobs, or ask hiring managers where they post open positions.
 Consulting Google also works; type your industry plus "jobs" into the search engine, and "chances are, if [niche job boards are] on the first page [of results], they're worth using," Russell says. You can also browse lists of niche sites like this one from Internet Inc.com, but recognize that they're not all-inclusive.

Keep your guard up for spammy sites, says Jeff Dickey-Chasins, a consultant who blogs about job boards. "There are plenty of sites out there that just sort of exist for traffic reasons." Owners of those sites make money off Google advertisements, so if the site you're using is over-populated with Google ads or others that are unrelated to employment, it's a good sign you should look elsewhere, he says.

More Tips and Complete USNews Article

Thursday, April 21, 2011

10 Tips for Effectively Using Your LinkedIn Status Update

By Careerealism


One of the features of LinkedIn that tends to be underutilized is the "Status Update" (also called your "Network Update") in your LinkedIn Profile. Your status update "block" is a white box located just below your picture on your "View My Profile" page. If you don't see such a block, then you've not posted a status update.

From your LinkedIn home page or your "Edit My Profile" page, you can change your status update as frequently as you desire. EVERY time you update your status, the home page of ALL of your network connections is "pinged" with your status update. Status updates are also distributed to your network via email when LinkedIn sends you your weekly "Network Update." Your latest status update is always displayed on your LinkedIn profile.

Your status updated is limited to 140 characters - just like Twitter - so keep that in mind, particularly when cutting and pasting information into your status update "window."

Updating your LinkedIn status is a great way to communicate to your network on a frequent and ongoing basis. I update my status at least once each day with different types of information. 10 tips for effectively using your status update to distribute useful information are presented below:

1. Insert the title and a "shortened" URL link to one of your recent blog articles. Bit.ly is a great resource for shortening URL's.

2. Insert the title and a "shortened" URL to a blog article you read and really liked. Particularly one that is timely, informative and relates to your "brand" or area of specialty in some way.

3. A link to a newsworthy web posting or news item. Include the title and a shortened URL. Alignment with you brand "voice" or area of specialty makes it more powerful. I like to focus on POSITIVE news as opposed to negative news.

4. A great "quote of the day." A great source of quotes of to search the #quote "hashtag" on Twitter. Since Twitter updates are limited to 140 characters, you'll find quotes that fit the LinkedIn status update window.

5. A brief piece of advice relevant to your brand or area of specialty.

So you want to work at Google

By Anne Fisher, contributor


Contrary to myth, new college grads don't need a 3.7-or-higher GPA to get hired at Google, says a new book. What they do need: Passion for technology and a track record of stellar achievement.



Dear Annie: I will be graduating from an Ivy League college in a couple of months and I'd really like to go to work for Google. The only problem is, I've heard that the company won't even interview anyone whose grade point average is below 3.7, and mine is barely 3.0.
That's mostly because I've spent a lot of time working at a tech startup in Boston instead of studying, just because it interests me more. For the past year or so, I've also put several hours a week into pro bono work for a local nonprofit, setting up a fundraising database, streamlining their bookkeeping, and developing their social media presence. I think these things are fine additions to my resume, but will my so-so GPA disqualify me? — Busy Off-Campus


Dear BOC: Your timing is terrific, since Google (GOOG) announced in January that it is embarking on a hiring spree this year. Alan Eustace, vice president for engineering and research, revealed in a blog post that Google expects to surpass its 2007 record for new hires. That year, the company added more than 6,000 people to its payroll.


The reason: Enormous growth in Google's Android mobile operating system, Google Apps platform, and Chrome browser, as well as other early-stage projects like Google Voice, robot cars, and an all-Web PC operating system. "We'll hire as many smart, creative people as we can to tackle some of the toughest challenges in computer science," Eustace wrote.


To boost your chances of being one of the people Google brings aboard, you might want to take a look at a new book, The Google Resume: How to Prepare for a Career and Land a Job at Apple, Microsoft, Google, or Any Top Tech Company. Author Gayle Laakmaan McDowell, a Wharton MBA, is founder and CEO of CareerCup.com, a job site for tech professionals.


Before launching that business, McDowell interned at Microsoft (MSFT) and Apple (AAPL). Then she worked in Google's engineering division for three years, where she served on the hiring committee, interviewed more than 120 job candidates, and pored over piles of resumes.


The experience gave her a clear understanding of which resumes get noticed and which ones land in the circular file. As the title suggests, the book includes samples of each, along with detailed notes on what kinds of experiences to include in your resume and how to present it.


You'll be heartened to hear that a 3.0 GPA doesn't necessarily wreck your prospects at Google. McDowell acknowledges that the 3.7-or-higher-GPA myth is widespread, but she discounts it. "When I joined Google, my team of eight people included three who didn't have college degrees at all," recalls McDowell. "And our next college hire had a GPA that wasn't so hot."


She adds: "Academia is merely one way to distinguish yourself, and there are plenty of others. So if your GPA, or your school, doesn't stand out, look for additional avenues. Besides, you'll need to excel in multiple areas to get your resume selected."
Your question suggests you've already got "multiple areas" going for you, so consider a few of the other things McDowell says Google looks for:
Find Out What They Are Looking For By Reading The Rest Of The Fortune Article

Wednesday, April 20, 2011

How Non-Profits Can Maximize Engagement on Facebook

by Zachary Sniderman


he Facebook Marketing Series is supported by Buddy Media. Eight of the world’s top ten brands use the Buddy Media Platform to power their social marketing on Facebook. Find out why here.


It’s important for any digitally-minded non-profit to be on Facebook because of the sheer number of active users. So, great — you set up a Facebook account for your organization. Now what?
Best practices are pretty variable when it comes to social media. This is especially true with Facebook, which switches up its appearance, services and features every few months. We did our best to put together some of the best approaches for non-profits, with some serious help from three social media mavericks at top causes.

Read on for some dos, don’ts, and a golden rule or two for how non-profits can better utilize Facebook.

How Facebook Can Help You



nwf story
“We have to remember that Facebook was not made for non-profits,” says Danielle Brigida, the digital media marketing manager at the National Wildlife Federation (NWF). “Unlike Twitter, it is very hard for an organization to foster any individual relationships on Facebook, and it is almost best used as a discussion tool or for broadcasting.”
This certainly doesn’t preclude the ability to have conversations with your audience. However, the format does change how and what your audience will respond to. A question about IT staffing on Facebook may result in crickets, but that question would perform well on LinkedIn, says Holly Ross, executive director of the Nonprofit Technology Network (NTEN). “But if we ask our Facebook group what kind of music we should add to our hold lines, we’ll get twenty responses in an hour.” Ross sees NTEN’s Facebook community as a virtual water cooler — great engagement is about knowing what your community wants from your various social media profiles.

Golden Rules of Facebook for Non-Profits



livestrong image
“Ask open ended questions and use [Facebook] as a two-way street,” says Brooke McMillan, Livestrong‘s online community manager. “Always stoke conversation between you and the fan as well as fan-to-fan. We’ve seen some of the most supportive comments in the fan-to-fan relationship.” McMillan has helped build a vibrant online support community on Livestrong’s Facebook page, which has become a key component of Livestrong’s online identity. On the tech side, McMillan recommends posting at least once a day or as often as your organization has fresh content.

For Brigida (NWF), her golden rule is actually the age-old golden rule: “I engage with people how I want to be treated on Facebook,” Brigida said. “I don’t post things that will not engage our members … or overshare.” The NWF has specific audience pages — for photographers, teachers, gardeners and more — which Brigida targets from message to message. Understand that your community may be interested in different facets of your organization and tailor your posts to those niches.

Definitely Do Not Do These Things


Our experts honed in on two major non-profit no nos: lack of purpose and being too promotional.
“You have to have a reason to be on Facebook,” says Ross (NTEN). “Are you recruiting volunteers? Cultivating activists? Stewarding your donors? You won’t find any success in Facebook if you don’t know what you’re trying to accomplish.” McMillan echoed this, urging non-profits to keep their site active and their audiences engaged.

The other unfortunate truth is that no one really likes press releases. You don’t like writing them or receiving them, and your fans will get turned off by boilerplate messages. That said, your fans do want updates and information about your success and new campaigns. Ross recommends writing a post specifically for Facebook rather than copy/pasting a release. Adds McMillan: “In the [non-profit] world we often have really great studies and scientific papers that we want to share, but the general public doesn’t necessarily want to read an abstract for a research study — snoozeville.”

Find a way to deliver this information in an engaging way and your Facebook fans will reward you by actually reading it.

Trade Secrets - Read The Rest Of The Mashable Article To Find Out

5 Twitter Job Services For Some Real-Time Job Search

by Saikat Basu


Twitter may not merit a serious look as a job hunting and recruitment tool. But that’s something a fresher or even an experienced professional will be ill advised to overlook. You can bet that when Twitter increasingly has the power to spread revolutions, it can be a vital ally of your job hunting campaign.
In its overreaching popularity lies its job hunting prowess. Companies are increasingly using it spread their updates. Vacancies and recruitment’s are just one of them.
Even if you do a simple search for a job lead on Twitter, you will be surprised at the number of links that total up. I am not even telling you to do an advanced Twitter search or develop industry specific social strategy. We are talking here of Twitter services that do the job of distilling relevant job tweets for you so that you can find jobs on Twitter.
Here are five of them.

Tweet My Jobs

find jobs on twitter
Somehow the image on this Twitter job app says it all. It is probably the largest Twitter job board on the web. The About page says that they have 10,052 vertical job channels segmented by geography, job type, and industry. The service is used by people on both sides of the table, the recruiters as well as the job seekers. It is free for job seekers. As a job seeker, you can sign-up and subscribe to a channel of your interest. Any news jobs available are sent as instant notifications as a Twitter feed or on your mobile. Beyond this, you can use the service like a regular job site: post your resume to companies or forward jobs to friends. Using TweetMap, a Google Maps mashup, you can geographically target jobs of your interest.



TwitJobSearch

twitter how to find a job
This Twitter job search engine is another well designed and maintained service which could be the answer to your job search prayers. You can instantly sign-in with your Twitter account and start a hunt. The site allows you to save jobs to your account, have an online resume, and network.  Creating a profile on this web service involves some fine-detailing as recruiters see what has been posted. You can also link the public LinkedIn URL or any other online CV you might have. The Advanced Search is just one way to trawl through Twitter job updates. For an industry specific browse, you can go to the directory which lists ‘Job Accounts’ for selected countries. Using the Job Map, you can visually see the jobs that have been tweeted about in the last 72 hours. The site also has a free iPhone app.

Job Shouts

twitter how to find a job
The easiest way to get the dope on the latest job postings collected by this site is via Twitter. JobShouts.com is a social search tool for jobs across many job boards that include LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter. All jobs are screened by the site, so the potential to hit the genuine ones is much higher for the job seeker.

Sites 4 - 5 and Complete Article

Tuesday, April 19, 2011

SEO Your Resume

By Leslie Barrett

Make your resume more ''findable'' on sites like TheLadders — optimizing your Web site is very different from doing that to your resume.

I often get questions about how to “optimize” resumes for search engines so that they will be “easier to find.” Most of the people who ask the question are already somewhat aware of a process called “Search Engine Optimization” and understand that it is related to things called “keywords.” While this is not exactly wrong, I would like to dispel a few misconceptions:

Search engines are not all alike: Google would not find a resume the same way TheLadders would, so “optimizing” your Web site is very different from doing that to your resume.
Keywords are just, well, words. There is nothing “special” about any particular word — it becomes special only by how often it occurs and the company it keeps.
This article will explain how to make your resume more “findable” on sites like TheLadders and why that process is very different from the “SEO” we hear so much about in marketing publications.

It is true that TheLadders is a search engine just as Google is, but the two products look at documents very differently. No search engine is able to break a document down into segments without a “map” — just the way you wouldn’t know that you were driving from New York to New Jersey unless you had some sort of clue — road signs, landmarks and the like. Similarly, Google knows that news articles and such have titles because documents intended for display on the World Wide Web can carry special “tags” that instruct a Web browser on what the primary topic of that page is and how it is to be displayed in a browser. Your resume does not have the tags, and hence lacks the “map” that a search engine needs. So Google would probably see your resume as just one big blob of words. That’s good enough for many kinds of documents, but not for resumes … for reasons that I will get to. So, what does TheLadders do to read your resume? TheLadders has what we call a “parser” that knows how to find things without a map and when it finds them it provides these “tags” and creates a new, search engine-friendly version of your resume.

What does all this mean? It means that a resume is more than a blob of words — it is different from a news article or blog or e-commerce site. It has several “parts” — not just a title and text body. For example, a resume lists jobs and each job has two parts — a title and a description. Most resumes also have an executive summary section providing an overview of skills. The point is that each of those sections carries a different message. Therefore not all words are created equal for the search engine — the words in the titles say something different than the words in other parts of the document. Accordingly, this means something to search engines like TheLadders, but not to Google. Words in different parts will be considered differently. In particular, your “keywords” receive greater or lesser weight depending on where they are.

More Advice and Complete Ladders Article

Social Networking for Career Success - LinkedIn tips from a recruiter

by Miriam Salpeter


I was so excited to learn yesterday that Sheryl Posnick, the editor in charge of my book at Learning Express, LLC, received the first copies back from the printer! I can’t wait to see the final version. It’s perfect timing, as I was just ramping up to share some tips here.

One thing I did when I wrote Social Networking for Career Success is tap my network of friends and colleagues to share advice and insights. While, in most (not all), cases, I could have written those sections myself, it made sense to me to provide an array of opinions — and, if they agreed with me (or I with them), all the better! When I headed up the career area at Emory’s Rollins School of Public Health, one frustrating thing was how students could listen to me tell them something over and over again, but it wasn’t until I invited a hiring manager or recruiter in to say the same thing that they adapted their job search strategies. I figured the same point holds true with readers: having me tell you, “Do this, follow this advice” may be helpful, but backing it up with 100 other insights is even better!

In that spirit, and to start highlighting the terrific colleagues who contributed to the book, today I am happy to have permission to share insights from Craig Fisher (@FishDogs on Twitter) from his post today about LinkedIn. Be sure to read the full post with LinkedIn tips (from a recruiter), but here are some highlights:

- What should you have on your LinkedIn profile if you’re looking for opportunities? A candidate should tell a good story that describes who they are and what they do well. You also need detailed job descriptions in your work history going back at least 10 years. The more relevant detail and specific keywords that you include in your profile, the easier it will be for recruiters and employers to find you when they search for appropriate candidates for their openings.


- What are some LinkedIn tools that you should be using? Use the apps available on your profile page to import content into your page. Apps that automatically import your blog posts, SlideShare presentations, etc. help your profile to rank higher in search results. The idea is to get more eyeballs on your Linkedin profile. Also update your status once or twice per day with something that would be interesting to your targeted employers or prospects.


- Are there any mistakes or misconceptions about this method of job searching? The top misconception is that if you just create a Linkedin profile, then you should get calls from employers or recruiters. Not so. You must optimize your profile with plenty of specific information that relates to your skill set; and participate in Linkedin groups, Q&A, and status updates. You must also grow your network. The more active you are, and the more people you connect with, the more people will see your profile.


More Advice and Complete Article

Monday, April 18, 2011

Older Job Seeker:Does Social Media Confuse You?

7 Secrets to Get a Job Using Social Media - do you know them?


Editors Note: Tooth Fairy, Santa Clause, The Baby Stalk and mailing resumes to HR. As an older worker do you ever feel that all the good fantasies are dead? What do you think?

Between current economic conditions and the technological evolution of the Internet, the traditional approach most job seekers have taken in the past is no longer viable.


The approach — developing a resume and cover letter, locating jobs on and submitting your resume to corporate sites and job banks, and crossing your fingers in hopes of receiving a call from a hiring manager — is, for the most part, a thing of the past. The new approach is far different. It boils down to the fact that there are fewer jobs available, more competition for those jobs and more touch points for recruiters and seekers to interact.

The current environment

There will be 1.5 million college graduates this year, yet the job growth rate is at a six year low, at 1.3%! The amount of jobs posted online is decreasing at over 13%, which has all led to the ratio of 3.3 job seekers per each job.

Social networks are starting to become part of the criteria that both hiring managers and college admissions officers are using to weed out applicants. One in five hiring managers conduct background checks using social networks (primarily Facebook), while one in ten college admissions officers do the same.

It’s time for you to be open-minded and think differently about how you’re going to get your next job and keep it. I’m not saying you shouldn’t submit your resume to job banks, corporate websites, vertical job agents (Simply Hired/Indeed) or attend job fairs, but these should only consume 10% of your time. The other 90% should be concentrated on the following seven social media secrets, which will not only get you a job, but help you create your own dream job!

1. Conduct a people search instead of a job search

The majority of jobs aren’t posted online. Hiring managers get a list of employee referral candidates before they even bother to view resumes from those who submit them online. Sometimes the listed jobs aren’t available or never existed in the first place. Many studies have noted that 80% of jobs are taken through networking, but few have sought to use the web to search and locate people they would actually enjoy working for at companies that they get excited about.

The 3-step people search:

1. Identify the top five companies that you would like to work for.
Use a focused approach instead of flooding thousands of inboxes with spam. You want to brand yourself, not just as the person of best fit for a job, but as someone who is eager and ecstatic to work for the company.

2. Use search engines to track employees that currently work there.
There are over 130 million blogs in Technorati and you can search through them to possibly find someone who works at one of your top five companies. You can search through corporate groups, pages and people on Facebook. You can even do the same on Twitter. Then there are people search engines such as pipl, peek you, and wink. Once you find a contact name, try googling it to see if there is any additional information about that person.

3. Connect with the person directly.
Social media has broken down barriers, to a point where you can message someone you aren’t friends with and don’t have contact information for, without any hassles. Before you message a target employee, realize that they receive messages from people asking for jobs all the time and that they might not want to be bothered on Facebook, where their true friends are. As long as you’ve done your homework on the company and them, tailor a message that states who you are and your interest, without asking for a job at first. Get to know them and then by the 3rd or 4th messages, ask if there is an available opportunity.

2. Use attraction-based marketing to get job offers

The traditional way of searching for a job was proactive, forcing you to start a job that you might not have enjoyed. The new approach is about building a powerful personal brand and attracting job opportunities directly into your doorstep. How do you do this? You become a content producer instead of just a consumer and the number one way to do that on the web is to launch a blog that centers around both your expertise and passions.

You need to be passionate to be committed to this project because it requires a lot of writing, creativity and consistency in order for it to actually help you. A blog is a non-intrusive, harmless and generous way of getting recruiters interested in your brand, without you even asking for a job! Make the recruiters fall in love with you and only send you opportunities that are related to your blog content, so you end up happy in the end.

This works a lot and is expected for new-age marketing jobs that require experience in social media and can even help you jump-start a new business off of your blog platform. By pulling recruiters into your world, you are able to impress them with what you want them to see and they can make a quick decision whether to hire you or not, without you hearing about rejection. Start a blog today using Wordpress.com (for beginners) or install Wordpress.org onto your own host (such as GoDaddy or Bluehost).
Click here to read part 2 of this article

Banks woo youth with social media

Robert Cartwright drives a company car. He has a laptop, iPhone and video camera paid for by this employer, and rarely spends time in the Bridgeton headquarters of Vantage Credit Union.


Instead, Cartwright is often online where he chats with 'fans' on social networking site Facebook, posts videos on YouTube, microblogs to 'followers' on Twitter, and does the kind of stuff you'd expect from a 26-year-old.

But he's not goofing off. Cartwright is spokesman for the credit union's youth marketing program, a key effort to win the financial business of the young demographic group Gen Y.




Vantage and many competing financial institutions are connecting with their next generation of customers by speaking their language -- social media -- and reaching them on smartphones.

"This age group, Generation Y, it's what we're on all the time," Cartwright said.

Several banks are also rolling out new accounts specifically geared to Gen Y, with no fees if they get their statements online and deposit checks electronically instead of visiting a bank branch.

The group's age range varies, but it generally includes teenagers up to 32-year-olds. It was dubbed "Y" after following Generation X -- typically defined as those ages 33 to 46 -- that succeeded the baby boomer generation.

The focus on youth is a way to build brand loyalty for future banking relationships, bankers say. In 2010, Gen Y's personal income, $2.4 trillion, accounted for one fifth of the total personal income in the U.S., according to Javelin Strategy & Research, a California-based financial services research firm. By 2025, when the last of the employed boomers draw closer to retirement age, Gen Y will account for 46 percent of personal income.

Financial institutions have been slow to use social media, because of regulatory and privacy issues. That's beginning to change as they realize that social media and smartphones are the main way to reach this coveted demographic, which prefers to 'tweet' or text instead of visiting a bank branch. Banks are primarily using social media for marketing and connecting with customers instead of account activity.

"Gen Y is influenced more by the comments of their peers than traditional advertising" such as TV and radio ads, said Jay Sinha, an associate professor of marketing and supply chain management at the Fox School of Business at Temple University in Philadelphia.

Financial institutions are following the lead of consumer products companies such as Adidas and Victoria's Secret that have used social media to increase sales, he noted.

"It adds positive cache to a brand, provided that it's not crass commercialism. Gen Y is really turned off by that," Sinha said.

To make sure Vantage's marketing message gets out, Cartwright posts dozens of Facebook and Twitter messages a week, showing up at baseball games and movie theaters that he tells his hundreds of online followers about and giving out free tickets and gift cards. He writes five blog posts a week on his website, youngfreestlouis.com and creates videos he posts to YouTube with tips on saving money and other topics.

"Most college kids are really bad with their money," he said. "I wish something like this would have been around when I was 18." Vantage Credit Union, which has 15 branches, hired Cartwright last year as its first "Young & Free" spokesman.

The job, which pays $30,000, lasts a year. In June, Vantage will begin the search for the next spokesperson. Cartwright, who has a degree in education, got the job after he created and posted an audition video online that was voted on by the public.

The program has paid off for Vantage, says Executive Vice President Eric Acree. Since last summer, 2,500 customers have enrolled in its account geared to 18- to 25-year-olds, which offers free checking and additional benefits, and 40 percent of those are customers new to Vantage.


Read The Rest Of The St. Louis Today Article

The Jobs Are There IF You Know How To Find Them

Recruiters tell how to find the jobs that are there.

Sunday, April 17, 2011

How to Search Job Boards You Never Heard Of

Do you know how many job boards there are online? What are you thinking? 20… 40…? 100…? There is an organization called “International Association of Employment Web Sites” and according to them there are more than 40,000 employment sites that serve job seekers, employers and recruiters worldwide. (See for yourself at: www.employmentwebsites.org )
That being said, how likely is it for you to search everyone? Pretty unlikely? Well, don’t be so sure. Eventhough there are 40,000+ job boards out there, Yahoo has done a pretty good job of indexing their content. As such, if you search Yahoo a certain way, you will be able to search most (if not all) of those employment sites. In doing so, you not only find jobs that your jobseeker competitors might know about, but you will also discover niche job boards that focus on your particular skillset. For example, let’s say that you are an accountant looking for an Accounts Receivables position. This is how I would look for that job with Yahoo.
  • intitle:accounting (intitle:job OR intitle:jobs OR intitle:careers) (apply OR submit OR eoe)
At this writing, there are 217,000 results! Not bad and since… what? (My spider sense is telling me that you have no idea what I just did.) Hmm… Let me explain to you what I just did with that search.
  • intitle:accounting – Yahoo look for web documents that have accounting in their title
  • (intitle:job OR intitle:jobs OR intitle:careers) – Hey Yahoo, while you’re at it, look for the words job or jobs or careers in the title of web documents as well.
  • (apply OR submit OR eoe) – Just before you show me anything, check those webpages for the words apply or submit or eoe. Why? Job descriptions typically say “apply for this job” or “submit your resume” or have eoe on it somewhere. (Equal Opportunity Employer)
Just in case the lightbulb is flickering in your mind (but not quite fully lit), here are a few more examples to spark your online curiosity.
This is how I would find an accounting job in Atlanta:
  • (404 OR 678 OR 770 OR 912) intitle:accounting (intitle:job OR intitle:jobs OR intitle:careers) (apply OR submit OR eoe)
This is how I would find an accounting job with great benefits:
  • “excellent benefits” intitle:accounting (intitle:job OR intitle:jobs OR intitle:careers) (apply OR submit OR eoe)
This is how I would find an accounting job where I could work from home:
  • (intitle:”work from home” OR intitle:virtual) intitle:accounting (intitle:job OR intitle:jobs OR intitle:careers) (apply OR submit OR eoe)
Although I am using Yahoo as the searchengine of choice, since their results are being powered by Bing, you can run the same searches there as well. In doing so, you may stumble across additional results? Why? Although the same search technology is powering both websites, they still have different indexes. Sure there will be some overlap, but there will always be some results unique to each engine. Hmm… for that matter, let’s take it a bit deeper and try this search on the metasearchengine – Dogpile. (What? What’s a metasearchengine? Oh, that’s a searchengine that searches other searchengines. Can you dig it?)
Hmm… Check out what I found when I used this search string:
See the search string and the rest of Jim Stroud's article