Monday, February 15, 2021

4 ways to refresh your résumé | video

 

For many people, February can be an optimal time to hunker down and start looking for a new job. Pavithra Mohan shares 4 résumé refresh tips to help you land a job during an uncertain year.

Thursday, February 11, 2021

10 Tips to Boost Your LinkedIn Presence in 2021

 

LinkedIn can be a great channel to build your personal brand, and even establish yourself as an influential thought leader within your niche. But in order to maximize the benefits of the platform, you need to understand how it works, what generates best response, and how you can utilize its various tools to optimal effect.

To help with this, in this post, we'll go over 10 things that you can do to become more influential on LinkedIn, including how much you should be posting, when to post, what to post, as well as how to take advantage of some of LinkedIn's cool features such as LinkedIn Live, discovering hashtags by popularity and post analytics.

Follow these tips and you'll be well on your way to building a stronger LinkedIn presence in 2021.

1. Post regularly but not too much

Maintaining a consistent posting process is important on LinkedIn - but posting too much can hurt your presence.

Through my research at Onalytica we've found that influencers who post more than 50 times a month on LinkedIn see an average of 26 engagements per post, while those who post between 30-50 times a month see an average of 56 engagements, and those who post less than 30 times see even more engagement, on average. 

Based on this, we recommend posting at least 2-3 times a week - but no more than 30 times a month for optimal engagement. 

When you post is also significant - try to post in the mornings, perhaps on your way in to work. Then you can revisit those posts later in the day/evening, to reply to any comments you’ve had and boost your engagement.

4. Don’t just share your own content

The 4-1-1 Rule was coined by Tippingpoint Labs and Joe Pulizzi of the Content Marketing Institute. While it was originally created with Twitter in mind, it can also be applied to LinkedIn.

The rule states that:

“For every one self-serving post, you should repost one relevant post and most importantly share four pieces of relevant content written by others.”

By following this rule, you're not just sharing your own content, but you're also providing helpful insights relevant to your audience written by others. This can be industry thought leader content, news, and trends.

At the same time, it’s also important to add your opinion. Many people just like or share posts that they've read, or sometimes without even reading them. You can set yourself apart by adding your own opinions, questions, or other commentary within the comments.

Tell people what you think about the points being made in the article, and don’t be afraid to respectfully disagree with something and suggest a different point of view. This can start a debate, and you’ll find that the post gets a lot more engagement.

5. Don’t be salesy

Although you're obviously looking to market yourself and your business, it's best to avoid being too pushy on this within your LinkedIn posts.

For example, try not to post directly about your product, as it can feel like an advert and turn people away. It‘s better to engage in thought leadership-style conversations, and if people like what you're saying, they'll go and check out your website and product offering.

At this stage it is more about building relationships and making new contacts.

See all 10 tips and the complete SocialMediaToday post

 

 

 

Wednesday, February 10, 2021

3 Tips On How To Gain Momentum In A February Job Search

 

Kourtney Whitehead

With a little planning and effort, you can make significant progress in your job search this month, attracting new opportunities and converting promising leads. But to be successful in these endeavors, you need to know what to expect so that you can get ready to adjust to the current and often-turbulent job market trends.

If you are launching or continuing a job search in February, here’s how you can focus your efforts to continue to make traction and achieve your goal of getting a new job in 2021.

1. Create a sustainable routine so you can outlast your competition

By February, many people that set out to get a new job in 2021 are already losing steam.

While January is an obvious time to launch a job search, as you are often propelled by the optimism for a new year, it is also one of the hardest months to get noticed in. The candidate supply is at its highest while many organizations are only just beginning to open up positions and rethink their hiring needs.

And it’s fair to say that this January’s job market took the dynamic to new heights, as US unemployment rates continued to stagnate, and new job openings were spotty.

However, the situation will begin to shift in February when many job seekers, especially those who are already employed and who have a more passive approach to their job search, begin to lose steam and refocus on the demands of daily life, often allowing their job search efforts to stop completely or go cold.

See tips 2,3, and the complete Forbes article

 

Tuesday, February 9, 2021

Over 50? Here’s 6 tips to get recruiters to notice you

 

Kaitlyn McInnis

The experience that workers over 50 bring to the table can be very valuable for a company—but unfortunately, oftentimes recruiters or hiring managers are quick to dismiss older applicants without real reason to do so.

That doesn’t mean you’re out of luck, though. If you’re over 50 and looking to start applying to new jobs, there are a few key ways to put yourself ahead and get noticed. Emphasizing your value is a good first step to getting a recruiter’s attention, but it can also help to proactively assuage some of the concerns they may have about recruiting older workers.

Below, we spoke to a handful of hiring managers and directors to get their top tips on exactly how applicants over 50 should approach the job search, initial interviews, and skeptical interviewers who may unintentionally be dismissive before hearing you out. 

2) Address the “overqualified” concern

“An experienced applicant applying for an entry-level role is almost always going to be overqualified for the position,” explains Hill. “This raises concerns that the person will get bored in their role or be unsatisfied with the lower salary it earns and demand more or move on.”

The best way to overcome this is to explain why you want this position, whether you’re looking to expand your skill-set, pivot careers, or simply want a more relaxed role for a better work/life balance. 

3) Focus on the recent past, not your whole career

You don’t want to lie about your age, of course, but you don’t need to draw attention to it, either. According to Hill, generally speaking, things should “age off” of your resume after about 10-15 years.

“This is good advice for anyone who’s established in their field, but is especially important for workers over 50. Similarly, you don’t need to list your graduation date in your education section, especially if it was several decades ago.”

5) Focus on your relevant transferable skills

Bring attention to highly sought after skills such as organizational skills, communication skills, and sales skills.

“These skills are crucial for any entry-level position,” says Paul French, Managing Director at Intrinsic Search. “Show how you used these skills to meet the needs of the employer in your past positions and how you will use them in the current position.”

See all 6 tips and the complete The Ladders article

 

Tuesday, October 6, 2020

6 Ways To Stand Out On Social Media When Searching For A New Job

Jack Kelly

The traditional job search methods of attending face-to-face networking events, inviting people to get a cup of coffee, dinner, an after-work cocktail and schmoozing at the office have been rendered irrelevant due to the pandemic.  

If you’re actively searching for a new job, you need to engage in an authentic branding and marketing campaign on social media. The key is to showcase your skills, ability, knowledge, achievements and brilliance. You also need to broadcast what you are looking to do next, so people are aware of how they can help you. It shouldn’t just be a one-way street. Offer your services to help others in need too.

3. What To Do Online

The best way to start branding yourself is by commenting, sharing, writing posts and articles on LinkedIn. The content should focus on your area of expertise, as you have a lot of knowledge to impart.

You can start slowly by liking and addressing the postings of others. Find leaders in your field with large followings. Get involved in their conversations to amplify your own voice. Keep in mind that the questions you answer and your responses should burnish your brand. Avoid getting sucked into toxic online arguments and stay far away from politics for now.

If you want to take it to the next level, create videos. You can discuss matters relevant to your field. In addition to LinkedIn, also pay attention to other social media platforms that are relevant to your profession. 

Set a schedule to contribute on a consistent basis. If you only post once in a while, you’ll get lost. Post regularly, so people get to know you and become interested in what you have to say next. You’ll start building an audience by continually marketing yourself. People will feel like they know you and would gladly help you out with job leads. 


5. Brag A Bit

Share some recent wins, accomplishments and achievements. Write about exciting projects that you’re working on. If you are an expert in your field, seek out online conferences and networking events. Try to become a speaker. This spotlight will make you known to a wider audience and you’ll be viewed as an expert and a leader in your space.  

6. Authenticity Counts

Be open about your goal of finding a new job. Let people know that you’re in the job market and what specifically you want to do next. If no one knows that you’re on the job hunt, they won't reach out to you with opportunities.  

It's fine to write about the emotions, challenges and pressure you're dealing with in your job search. By openly expressing yourself, people will get to know you as a real person.


See all 6 ways and the complete Forbes article

 

Never put these 3 ‘outdated’ sections at the top of your resume, says career expert

 

 J.T. O’Donnell

Landing your dream job is all about making a good first impression, and much of that has to do with what you put at the very top of your resume. Unfortunately, too many job seekers don’t utilize this space to their best advantage.

One of the biggest mistakes job seekers make is starting their resumes with long-winded, boring and self-important paragraphs about how great they are. But guess what? Everyone applying for that position thinks they’re great and worthy of a recruiter’s time.

Here are three outdated resume techniques that no longer work with hiring managers:

  1. Summary statements: The responsibilities and accomplishments listed in the job history section of your resume should already paint a picture of what you bring to the table, so there’s no need to amplify it with a long preface.
  2. Objective statements: This doesn’t offer any new or useful information. What’s the point of spelling out the obvious fact that you’re interested in the position?
See all 3 things PLUS what to do instead

Monday, October 5, 2020

10 Ways to Ask for the Job at the Interview

By Robin Madell

Wondering how to ask for a job? If you really want a particular job, then simply asking for it at the end of your interview may help seal the deal. Hiring managers like hearing an interviewee say they want the job – it shows an enthusiasm for the role and confirms that you’re invested in earning it. It would be a rare manager who wouldn’t be flattered by someone expressing that they sincerely want to be awarded the position that the company is offering.

While it may feel uncomfortable to come out and directly ask for what you want, it’s important to remember that you’re bringing something valuable to the table: your skills and experience. If you keep this in mind, it can help level the playing field and boost your confidence as you prepare to ask for a job in person.

While you shouldn’t fear hearing “no” or feel that it’s presumptuous or too forward to indicate you would genuinely like the job, you should be sure that you indeed truly want the position. If you have any hesitation or uncertainty or think you may be applying for the wrong reasons, then don’t lead the employer astray by suggesting otherwise.

Assuming you really want the opportunity, keep in mind that the way that you go about phrasing your ask can make or break whether or not your request is effective. Consider this list of potential phrases to say when asking for a job at the end of an interview – without sounding like you’re begging.

10 Ways to Ask for a Job at the Interview

  • “After hearing you discuss the position, I remain confident that I’d be a great fit for it. I’d love to join your team to help you reach your goals.”
  • “The position sounds amazing, and I’m very excited about what the company is doing. I’d love to be seriously considered for this position.”
  • “After talking with you, I feel like we’d work really well together. Is there anything else I can tell you about my background to help convince you to hire me?”
  • “I’m very excited about what you’ve explained you’re looking for in this position, because I feel I’m a perfect fit for it. Do you have a sense yet of when you’ll be making a final decision? I’d love to work with you and your team.”
See all 10 ways and the complete US News article